Yearly Archives:: 2011


“Android Malware” – Thre@t Reply(video)

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Are Android phones susceptible to Trojans and other viruses just like computer? How can you make sure your phone doesn’t become infected and if it does, what can you do? Webroot mobile threat research analyst, Armando Orozco answers this question that was asked to our Webroot Threat Research team via Twitter. [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=55-CL-_TiEM]

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For your eyes only (please)

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By the Webroot Threat Team Have you ever had the queasy experience of sending a message to someone that you’d rather not have anyone else see, and then hoping that it won’t get passed along? A new system developed by Internet law and security researchers aims to solve the problem, with a light-handed touch. The Stanford Center for Internet and Society has launched Privicons, an email privacy tool that it describes as a ‘user-to-user’ solution. There are no policy servers, crypto algorithms, or software enforcement agents to worry about. Instead, it relies on good old-fashioned icons. Webmail users who install […]

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Everyone has a role in protecting a corporate infrastructure (Part 1)

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By Jacques Erasmus This time of year, those of us in information security become wary of crafty criminals leveraging the winter holidays to prey on our employees’ lack of awareness online in a number of ways. All it takes is for one Trojan to infect a single PC in a company to put an entire infrastructure at risk. Everyone plays a role in protecting the assets and information of their organization. To help explain what this means for you as an IT manager, an employee or even a home user, we have developed a two-part primer on common threats you […]

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Reflections on mobile security

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By Armando Orozco Be wary the next time you enter your passcode into your iPhone on the bus – someone could be shoulder surfing. In fact, a team of researchers from the University of North Carolina has developed a system to watch you pecking out characters on your phone, analyse the video, and produce a pretty accurate guess of what you were typing. When people talk about key loggers, they’re usually thinking about malware that sits on a computer and surreptitiously monitors what keys people are pressing. But these university researchers are applying an entirely different approach to key logging. […]

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‘Tis the season for mobile malware

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By Armando Orozco You’ve heard of the “perfect storm”? Well, there may be one brewing in Android-land. We just wrapped up a study that revealed holiday shopping is about to go mobile—in a big way. Turns out, over two times more shoppers plan to buy gifts on their mobile device this year. Over two times more?! It got me thinking… We know that Android malware is on the rise. Even Android users themselves seem aware of it; our mobile study also found that 23 percent more Android users are concerned with the security of their information than iOS users. And […]

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Top 7 Cybersecurity Predictions for 2012

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By Mel Morris From Stuxnet to Sony, a number of cyberattacks emerged in 2011 that experts have predicted for quite some time. I predict 2012 will be even more pivotal, thrusting cybersecurity into the spotlight. These are my top seven forecasts for the year ahead: 1) Targeted, zero-day attacks will be the norm. Looking back over the past year, an increasing number of breaches were the result of custom malware and exploits targeting specific enterprises. I predict 2012 will be the year of targeted attacks, which have slowly evolved from large-scale threats to unique attacks designed to infect a handful […]

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In space, no one can hear you hack

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By the Webroot Threat Team Two of NASA’s satellites were hacked during 2007 and 2008, according to a draft report to be officially released later this month. According to the United States-China Economic and Security Review Commission, the ‘birds’, which focused on Earth observation for tasks such as climate monitoring, were reportedly pwned by the attackers, to the extent that they could have taken total control of the systems, had they wished. The Landsat-7 earth observation satellite was hacked into for twelve minutes, during October 2007 and July 2008. The Terra AM-1 earth observation satellite was disrupted for two minutes […]

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This blackhole exploit kit gives you Windows Media Player and a whole lot more

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By Mike Johnson As a follow-up to the Blackhole Exploit posting, I thought I would share one aspect of my job that I truely enjoy: Discovery. While investigating some active urls being served up via a blackhole kit, I noticed something quite odd, as I would end up on sites that had malicious code injected into their webpages. Once the redirection to the blackhole kit was initiated, I saw the usual exploits taking place, first being Internet Explorer and Adobe Flash, then onto Adobe Reader and Java. This time, the kit didn’t stop there. Internet Explorer proceeded to launch Windows Media Player. Since I had never […]

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Will you take Facebook’s candy?

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By the Webroot Threat Team It’s a creepy treat, with a serious underlying message. The latest viral website uses a horror movie format to show you just how much the average Facebook application can find out about you. TakeThisLollipop, which has already received 1.7 million ‘Likes’ on Facebook, uses the social network’s application authentication scheme to find out about users. Anyone clicking on the lollipop displayed on the site is asked to let the application access a panoply of information about them from Facebook, in addition to other privileges, such as posting as them. If they accept, they get to […]

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I don’t think it means what you think it means…

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Websites Hosting Android Trojans   By Armando Orozco and  Nathan Collier Rogue Android apps are making their way into alternative markets. Yes, we’ve seen some malicious apps trickle through and they can be elusive. But we’re now seeing markets that are only hosting malware. These rogues are of the premium rate SMS variety and request the user to send a bounty if they want the app. The interesting thing is that the websites they’re hosted on are very well put together and you can see that a great deal of time was put into creating them.  The Websites These well-crafted […]

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