Monthly Archives:: February 2013


Recap from RSA2013: Android Malware Exposed

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On Wednesday, February 27th, Webroot’s Security Intelligence Director (Grayson Milbourne) and  Senior Mobile Analyst (Armando Orozco) presented at the RSA Conference in San Francisco.  Their topic, Android Malware Exposed – An In-depth Look at its Evolution, is an expansion on their previous year’s presentation, highlighting the severity of Android malware growth.  Focusing on the history of operating system releases and the diversity across the market, as well at the threat vectors and behaviors in the evolution of Android malware, the team has established strong predictions for 2013.

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How much does it cost to buy 10,000 U.S.-based malware-infected hosts?

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Earlier this month, we profiled and exposed a newly launched underground service offering access to tens of thousands of malware-infected hosts, with an emphasis on the fact that U.S.-based hosts were relatively more expensive to acquire, largely due to the fact that U.S.-based users are known to have a higher online purchasing power. How much does it cost to buy 10,000 U.S.-based malware-infected hosts? Let’s find out. In this post, I’ll profile yet another service offering access to malware-infected hosts internationally, that’s been operating since the middle of 2012, and despite the fact that it’s official Web site is currently […]

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How mobile spammers verify the validity of harvested phone numbers

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Have you ever received a blank call, and no one was on the other side of the line? What about a similar blank SMS received through your mobile carrier’s Mail2SMS gateway? There’s a high probability that it was a mobile spammer who’s automatically and efficiently verifying the validity of a recently harvested database of mobile numbers, with QA (Quality Assurance) in mind. These verified databases will be later on used as the foundation for a highly successful spam/scam/malicious software disseminating campaigns, thanks to the fact that the cybercriminals behind them will no longer be shooting into the dark. How do they do […]

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Malicious ‘Data Processing Service’ ACH File ID themed emails serve client-side exploits and malware

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A cybercriminal/gang of cybercriminals that we’ve been closely monitoring for a while now has just launched yet another spam campaign, this time impersonating the “Data Processing Service” company, in an attempt to trick its customers into interacting with the malicious emails. Once they do so, they are automatically exposed to the client-side exploits served by the Black Hole Exploit Kit. In this post, I’ll profile their latest campaign and the dropped malware. I will also establish a direct connection between this and three other previously profiled malicious campaigns, as well as an ongoing money mule campaign, all of which appear […]

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How do we use, secure, and share the information that surrounds us?

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The mobile landscape has boomed in the last couple of years mostly in part because of Android devices and social networking. This has opened the door for everyone to have access to a smartphone and have the cyber world at their fingertips. Smartphones have become an extension of us, and we now have our email, banking, social networking, television and internet on the go. We live in a world of instant access. With this excitement and convenience, we may lose track something we take serious is our privacy and security. Looming in this mobile landscape are people who want benefit […]

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DIY malware cryptor as a Web service spotted in the wild

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Just how easy is it to generate an undetected piece of malware these days? Too easy to be true, largely thanks to the rise of managed crypting services, and the re-emergence of the DIY (do it yourself) trend within the entire cybercrime ecosystem. With hundreds of thousands of new malware variants processed by the industry on a daily basis, it’s fairly logical to conclude that over the years, the bad guys have adapted to signature-based antivirus scanning protection mechanisms, and have achieved disturbing levels of automation and efficiency. How do they do that? Let’s find out by profiling a recently spotted Web-based DIY […]

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Fake ‘Verizon Wireless Statement” themed emails lead to Black Hole Exploit Kit

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On a periodic basis, cybercriminals are spamvertising malicious campaigns impersonating Verizon Wireless to tens of thousands of Verizon customers across the globe in an attempt to trick them into interacting with the fake emails. Throughout 2012, we intercepted two campaigns pretending to come from the company, followed by another campaign intercepted last month. This tactic largely relies on the life cycle of a particular campaign, intersecting with the publicly generated awareness of its maliciousness. In this post, I’ll profile one of the most recently spamvertised campaigns impersonating Verizon Wireless. Not surprisingly, once users click on any of the links found in the malicious emails, they’re […]

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Malicious ‘RE: Your Wire Transfer’ themed emails serve client-side exploits and malware

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Over the last couple of days, we’ve been monitoring a persistent attempt to infect tens of thousands of users with malware through a systematic rotation of multiple social engineering themes. What all of these campaigns have in common is the fact that they all share the same malicious infrastructure. Let’s profile one of the most recently spamvertised campaigns, and expose the cybercriminals’ complete portfolio of malicious domains, their related name servers, dropped MD5 and its associated run time behavior. More details:

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Malware propagates through localized Facebook Wall posts

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We’ve recently intercepted a localized — to Bulgarian — malware campaign, that’s propagating through Facebook Wall posts. Basically, a malware-infected user would unknowingly post a link+enticing message, in this case “Check it out!“, on their friend’s Walls, in an attempt to abuse their trusted relationship and provoke them to click on the malicious link. Once users click on the link, they’re exposed to the malicious software. More details:

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