Webroot Threat Team Member - Marcus Moreno

Marcus Moreno

Role: Threat Team Member
Threat Blog Posts: 4

Marcus has always had a fascination with computers and electronics in general. His first encounter with cyberspace was in the 90’s when he was first introduced to Prodigy Net and has stayed connected since. His first tech job was soon after high school at IBM working as an interpreter for Spanish speakers in Mexico and Puerto Rico. While displaying his ease of learning and desire to helping others, he was then promoted to remote desktop technician. After a few years at IBM, Marcus then worked with Northrop Grumman as a network administrator.

Marcus appreciates the fast paced, challenging, yet enjoyable work of threat research. He is driven by his passion for computers and the innovative company he works for.



Posts by Marcus Moreno:

ThreatVlog Episode 13: Unwanted Applications, Audio Ads, and Microsoft

by

In the first ThreatVlog of 2014, Marcus Moreno discusses the increase in Potentially Unwanted Applications/Programs and their impact on machines, productivity, and the user experience. Also in the video is a talk on the wonderful audio ads that have been infecting machines and annoying computer users, discussing how they get into the machine and where to find them. Finally, he talks about Microsoft’s call for all security companies to come together to help end malicious malware families.

Continue Reading »

ThreatVlog Episode 8: DNS hijack through phishing and the Adobe breach

by

In this episode of the ThreatVlog, Marcus talks about the DNS hijack that took down a slew of popular websites, including WhatsApp, AVG, and Avira. These accounts were all compromised through one simple phishing scheme going after the Network Solutions accounts. Marcus also discusses the basics of the Adobe hack.

Continue Reading »

ThreatVlog Episode 6: FBI Ransomware forcing child porn on infected computers

by

In this episode of the ThreatVlog, Marcus Moreno discusses a new, very malicious form of FBI Ransomware that forces the users of infected machines to look at illegal imagery, taking the scare tactics to the next level. He also discusses a new Javascript hack that takes over your browser temporarily, attempting to get people to pay for it to be unlocked.

Continue Reading »