Posts Categorized: Deep Knowledge


Webroot Bulletin Regarding AV-Comparatives Results

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If there is one thing that can be observed about the AV industry, it is that no solution is ever 100% effective at blocking malware. With this in mind, Webroot SecureAnywhere (WSA) was designed to protect users even in cases where undetected malicious software has made it onto the system. AV-Comparatives recently published results for June’s “Real World” Protection Test. This test aims to replicate a real world experience for how malware would infect a PC. The scores indicate how many threats were detected vs. missed.

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Trojan Downloaders actively utilizing Dropbox for malware distribution

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By Curtis Fechner It’s never surprising to see the multitude of tactics a cybercriminal will use to deliver malware. In this case, I came across a collection of files masquerading as RealNetworks updater executables. These files were all located in a user’s %AppData%realupdate_ob directory, and the sizes were all quite consistent. At first glance there was nothing too special about this finding – malware appearing to be legitimate software is nothing new. When I looked into the specific behaviors of the file, it became clearer that the software is in fact malicious, and that it is actually downloading malicious files […]

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An Evolution of Android Malware “My How You’ve Grown PJAPPS!” (Part 1)

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We’ve all seen software grow.  We watch as our favorite software adds on new features and becomes better at what it does.  Malware writers are no different, they want their software to have more features as well as steal even more information. PJApps is a good example of this. PJApps is a Trojan that’s been around for a while causing havoc by being bundled in legitimate applications found in alternative Android markets, it is capable of opening a backdoor, stealing data and blocking sms behind the scenes.  In one variant of PJApps it requests the following permissions to steal information: […]

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Top 7 Cybersecurity Predictions for 2012

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By Mel Morris From Stuxnet to Sony, a number of cyberattacks emerged in 2011 that experts have predicted for quite some time. I predict 2012 will be even more pivotal, thrusting cybersecurity into the spotlight. These are my top seven forecasts for the year ahead: 1) Targeted, zero-day attacks will be the norm. Looking back over the past year, an increasing number of breaches were the result of custom malware and exploits targeting specific enterprises. I predict 2012 will be the year of targeted attacks, which have slowly evolved from large-scale threats to unique attacks designed to infect a handful […]

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A look inside the SpyEye Trojan admin console

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By Michael Johnson At Webroot we’ve been researching and chronicling developments with SpyEye since we first saw it in April 2010. This nasty Trojan is the successor to the Zeus Trojan, and it became essentially the main rootkit available for sale after the author of ZeuS left the underground market and sold ZeuS sources to the SpyEye team. Over the last six months, through Webroot’s real-time watch technology and through my own adventures hunting malware proactively in my spare time, I’ve noticed an extreme escalation of SpyEye infections. Last week I came across a URL for a password-protected site and […]

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Morto Worm Annoyances Outstrip Functionality

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The past couple of days have been very busy for a lot of people, following the announcement by Microsoft that they had discovered a new network worm called Morto. After reading the refreshingly thorough writeup about Morto from both Microsoft and our partner Sophos, we were surprised to find that a few of our customers had been infected — and cleaned up — beginning with some poor schlub in South Africa as early as July 23rd, but the worm kicked into high gear last Thursday and began to propagate rapidly. But, as much as the technical details in these posts […]

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Black Hat Redux: Botnet Takedown Mistakes to Avoid

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I’ve worked in the security industry for nearly five years, and it was apparent early on that the most successful people in this field bring to their work a passion and a commitment to protecting not only one’s customers, but to providing a certain level of information about security threats to the world at-large, so even your non-customers can help or protect themselves. It can be hard to know where to stop once you get on a roll. Malware infections frequently lead to unexplored, interesting backwaters on the Internet. And, sometimes, those backwaters are where the criminals run those operations. […]

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Targeted Malware Infects Windows-based Cash Registers

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A serious, targeted threat from customized malware that steals credit card magnetic strip track data could literally bankrupt your business. That’s the message two security researchers from Trustwave gave at their talk during the Defcon computer security conference Saturday. The researchers, Jibran Ilyas and Nicholas Percoco of Trustwave Spider Labs, respond to calls for help when businesses find malware in critical systems. When banks field reports of credit card fraud, they try to find the earliest common location or business where all the victims used their card. When they do, the bank calls the business, who then call in the […]

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TDL3 and ZeroAccess: More of the Same?

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By Marco Giuliani In our previous technical analysis of the ZeroAccess rootkit, we highlighted how it acts as a framework by infecting the machine — setting up its own private space in the disk, first through a dedicated file system on the disk, and more recently by using a hidden and locked directory. This is where the rootkit stores the modules it downloads from the command and control servers. Until now, the plugins we’ve monitored have been ad-clickers and search engine hijackers. We have also noted how the ZeroAccess rootkit acts very similar to the TDL3 rootkit, either by infecting […]

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Two Days in Vegas: Black Hat in Brief

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The Black Hat briefings, held Wednesday and Thursday this week, once again brought together some of the best and brightest in the security industry to share knowledge about novel attacks and better defenses against old and new attacks. And, once again, there were some eye opening moments at the conference. Right from the beginning, it was clear the scope of the conference had shifted from the previous year. Conference founder Jeff Moss described a new, more rigorous committee-driven process that Black Hat had begun to employ to scrutinize and vet talk proposals. Talks this year would be more technical, go […]

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