Posts Categorized: hijack search results


DIY Python-based mass insecure WordPress scanning/exploting tool with hundreds of pre-defined exploits spotted in the wild

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Throughout 2013, we not only witnessed the re-emergence of proven mass, efficiency-oriented Web site hacking/exploitation tactics, such as, the reliance on Google Dorks scanning, good old fashioned brute-forcing, but also, the introduction of new concepts, successfully utilizing/standardizing, both, compromised accounting data, and server-farm level access, in an attempt to fraudulently monetize the hijacked traffic from legitimate Web sites. As we’ve seen on numerous occasions throughout the years, despite sophisticated ‘innovations’, cybercriminals are no strangers to the KISS (Keep It Simple Stupid) principle. Case in point in terms of Content Management Systems (CMSs) is WordPress, whose market share is naturally proportional with […]

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Cybercrime Trends 2013 – Year in Review

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It’s that time of the year! The moment when we reflect back on the cybercrime tactics, techniques and procedures (TTPs) that shaped 2013, in order to constructively speculate on what’s to come for 2014 in terms of fraudulent and malicious campaigns, orchestrated by opportunistic cybercriminal adversaries across the globe. Throughout 2013, we continued to observe and profile TTPs, which were crucial for the success, profitability and growth of the cybercrime ecosystem internationally, such as, for instance, widespread proliferation of the campaigns, professionalism and the implementation of basic business/economic/marketing concepts, improved QA (Quality Assurance), vertical integration in an attempt to occupy […]

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How fraudulent blackhat SEO monetizers apply Quality Assurance (QA) to their DIY doorway generators

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How are cybercriminals most commonly abusing legitimate Web traffic? On the majority of occasions, some will either directly embed malicious iFrames on as many legitimate Web sites as possible, target server farms and the thousands of customers that they offer services to, or generate and upload invisible doorways on legitimate, high pagerank-ed Web properties, in an attempt to monetize the hijacked search traffic. In this post I’ll profile a DIY blackhat SEO doorway generator, that surprisingly, has a built-in module allowing the cybercriminal using it to detect and remove 21 known Web backdoors (shells) from the legitimate Web site about to be abused, just in case […]

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Webroot’s Threat Blog Most Popular Posts for 2012

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It’s that time of the year! The moment when we look back, and reflect on Webroot’s Threat Blog most popular content for 2012. Which are this year’s most popular posts? What distinguished them from the rest of the analyses published on a daily basis, throughout the entire year? Let’s find out.

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Researchers intercept malvertising campaign using Yahoo’s ad network

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Security researchers from StopMalvertising.com have intercepted a malvertising campaign using Yahoo’s ad network, that ultimately leads to a malicious payload in the form of fake security software known as scareware. More details:

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Five Summer Travel Security Tips

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Ah, summer. Beaches, drinks with little umbrellas, 4th of July fireworks, baseball games, reading long cheesy novels in a lounge chair, teleconferencing with colleagues from your hotel room in Aruba. Wait, what? Yes, it’s true. It takes serious discipline to travel without schlepping along a laptop, smartphone, digital camera, MP3 player, portable hard drive, SD cards, and a host of support equipment. Well, it does for me, anyway. Along with those devices come pitfalls, from loss to data theft. So, in the spirit of safe summer travel, in advance of the big 4th of July travel weekend, what follows are […]

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Phishers Cast Their Nets in the Social Media Pool

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By Ian Moyse, EMEA Channel Director It can seem at times that the only people who like change are Internet attackers. And they don’t just like it—they need it. Technology’s rapid changes give cybercriminals new attack vectors to exploit, and new ways to turn a profit out of someone else’s misfortune. Take phishing, for example. The concept is simple: Send an email disguised as a message from a bank, PayPal, or UPS. Wait for the user to click a link in the message, and enter their private details into a phishing site, and presto! The attacker attains financial or personal […]

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Fake UPS Document Installs Fake Microsoft Patch Payload

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As if we didn’t have enough to deal with this week — after a Microsoft patch Tuesday that brought with it a boatload of security updates for Windows, Office, Silverlight, Visual Studio, and other programs — some enterprising malware distributor is emailing around bogus tracking number malware dressed up in the icon of a PDF document, and that malware is downloading payloads named after the updaters that Windows Update retrieves during an update. The malware arrived into one of our spam collection points with an attachment named UPS_document.zip. Way to be original there, criminals. Inside the Zip file was an […]

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ROTW: “Total Security” and Antivirus IS

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By Brenden Vaughan and Andrew Brandt This week, our support and advanced malware removal (AMR) team did not have a lot of new data to report about rogue security products. The most commonly encountered infection continues to be one of the rogues we reported about last week. While we may refer to it as XP Total Security, it actually chooses one of a series of names at random, based on the operating system on the victim’s computer. Last week’s post contains a more comprehensive list of these names. As previously reported, you can remove the rogue by scanning (with our […]

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