Posts Categorized: Downloaders


ZeroAccess Rootkit Guards Itself with a Tripwire

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By Marco Giuliani The latest generation of a rapidly evolving family of kernel-mode rootkits called, variously, ZeroAccess or Max++, seems to get more powerful and effective with each new variant. The rootkit infects a random system driver, overwriting its code with its own, infected driver, and hijacks the storage driver chain in order to hide its presence on the disk. But its own self-protection mechanism is its most interesting characteristic: It lays a virtual tripwire. I’ve written about this rootkit in a few recent blog posts and in a white paper. On an infected computer, this new driver sets up […]

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Fake UPS Document Installs Fake Microsoft Patch Payload

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As if we didn’t have enough to deal with this week — after a Microsoft patch Tuesday that brought with it a boatload of security updates for Windows, Office, Silverlight, Visual Studio, and other programs — some enterprising malware distributor is emailing around bogus tracking number malware dressed up in the icon of a PDF document, and that malware is downloading payloads named after the updaters that Windows Update retrieves during an update. The malware arrived into one of our spam collection points with an attachment named UPS_document.zip. Way to be original there, criminals. Inside the Zip file was an […]

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Android ‘Angry Birds’ Malware Contains Bot-like Code

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Most of yesterday, Threat Research Analyst Armando Orozco and I took a closer look at a piece of malware discovered by a university security researcher, Xuxian Jiang of North Carolina State. The malicious code, which the malware creator named Plankton, is embedded into a number of apps that were briefly posted to Google’s Android Market earlier this week, then rapidly pulled down after the researchers informed Google of their initial findings. The Plankton code appears in a number of applications that were all focused on the popular game series Angry Birds. Some of the samples we looked at came as […]

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Korean Rogues’ Slapfight Bonanza

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The other day, Threat Reseacher Dan Para sent along the video clip below, which gave us all a good laugh. Dan had been researching a Korean-language Trojan downloader, but when he ran the file, he didn’t expect the downloader to retrieve not one…not two…but three separate rogue antivirus products. The most amusing thing about the video is that these three rogues — named Smartscan, Antiguard, and Bootcare — decided to duke it out amongst themselves to be front-and-center on the desktop. But each time one of the apps would bring itself to the front, both of the others would respond […]

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Pinball Corp’s Appbundler Employs Malware-like Techniques

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For a couple of weeks now, I’ve been noticing a curious (and increasingly prevalent) phenomenon: Some of the free Web hosts popular among those who engage in phishing are popping new types of multimedia ads over the tops of the pages they host. Not only does the victim, in this case, risk having their login credentials to banks or social media sites phished, but many of those ads behave almost identically to “missing codec” social engineering scams that have been popular among malware distributors for years. The ads — and I use the term very loosely, because these contrivances fall […]

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Shipping Confirmations Back on the Radar

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After a prolonged absence, waves of Trojans distributed as Zipped email attachments have been showing up in our spam traps for a few weeks. The spam messages employ the same hackneyed shipping confirmation pretext as many previous iterations of this scam. This technique’s emergence as a common malware distribution method correlates with the emergence of Trojan-Downloader-Tacticlol. The messages claim to come from various express shippers, including DHL, UPS, and FedEx, as well as one that may have originated in a malware guy’s imagination: Post Express. And even though the distribution method mimics those used by Tacticlol, the payloads haven’t been […]

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Shorty Worm Spams Links, Hijacks Browsers

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A novel worm we’re calling Worm-IM-Shorty appears to be winding its way through Facebook and some instant messaging services, with its come-on disguised as a link to a photograph hosted elsewhere. But when recipients click the link, they receive an executable Trojan instead, dressed up with the name and icon of a JPEG image. If one double-clicks the file, the Trojan turns the computer into an advertising cash cow for some enterprising malware distributor. The Trojan modifies the active browser’s home page setting to a malicious page on domredi.com, which in turn redirects the browser, at random, to one of […]

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New Bank Phisher Brings Added Functionality, Problems

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I didn’t want to let too much time pass before I wrote about a new Zbot-like bank phishing Trojan variant that came across my desk last week. The keylogger started arriving the first week of February as an attachment to a spam email designed to look like it came from United Parcel Service. No, the old malware trope of spammed shipping invoices is not dead yet, Alice, but we’re going to follow this one down the rabbit hole anyhow. The brief message had a Subject line of “United Parcel Service notification” followed by a random, five-digit number, and a file […]

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New Year’s Drive-By Brings a Recursive Rogue

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On the morning of January 2nd, still bleary eyed, I checked my email to find a charming notification informing me that I’d received an electronic greeting card. Yay! I thought to myself: The first targeted malware of 2011 plopped right into my lap. I immediately pulled up my research machine, browsed to the URL in the message (don’t try this at home, kids), and found my test system swamped in malware. After classifying the files and their source URLs into our definitions — I didn’t want this to happen to you, after all — I turned the computer back off […]

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Fake Firefox Update is a Social Engineering Triple Fail

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Where’s the work ethic, malware geniuses? If this latest example of shenanigans is the best you can deliver, you’re not even trying to generate convincing scams — or even something that makes sense — anymore. One of our Threat Research Analysts pointed me to a Web page hosting a fake update program for Firefox the other day, and the only thing it was useful for was a pretty good laugh. In replicating the Firefox “you’re now running…” page, the malware distributor managed only to build something that looks remarkably similar to a more sophisticated, and ultimately more plausible, scam we […]

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