Posts Categorized: malware


“OMG! Vuvuzela banned!” Tweets Infect Followers

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Malware authors must have a soft spot in their hearts for the long-maligned South African vuvuzela, because once again, the  most annoying noisemaker in World Cup history is driving people to Web sites which push infections down to their computers. This time, people are retweeting the malicious links attached to a message that reads “OMG! Vuvuzela banned!” along with the hashtags #worldcup and #vuvuzelabanned. At last check in Google, references to the malicious links number over 16,000. The tweets use a variety of different link shortening services (including bit.ly, tinyurl.com, is.gd, and dr.tl) to mask the fact that their destination […]

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Keylogger Poses as Document from Spain’s Central Bank

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An attempt to push down the Trojan-Backdoor-Zbot password thief to Spaniards may signal a new wave of attacks by a crew of attackers who spent the better part of 2009 trying to convince gullible Internet users in different countries to download and execute Zbot installers poorly disguised as transaction records or other important financial documents. A bogus Banco de España (BdE) Web site came and went quickly last week, but not before we took a deep dive and came up with a mouthful of malware. Believe me, it tasted terrible. The page, designed to mimic closely the appearance of the […]

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More World Cup Shenanigans: “Anti-Vuvuzela Filter”

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Someone called my attention today to a Web site selling something called an Anti-Vuvuzela Filter that costs €2.95 to download. Only, it’s a complete fraud. For the twelve other people in the world who haven’t been watching the World Cup matches in South Africa, the Vuvuzela is a South African horn that makes an obnoxious buzzing sound when played. The noise is said to be so irritating that fans have been watching the matches on television with the sound muted so they don’t have to hear the incessant wasp-like drone of Vuvuzela-toting fans inside the stadium. If you haven’t experienced […]

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Facebook “Photo Album” Spam Drops Trojans

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A spammed link campaign that spread through Facebook rapidly over the weekend delivered a malicious payload designed to take control of the Facebook account of any infected user, steal passwords, and hijack clicks in the victim’s browser. The messages appear as links sent by a friend, accompanied by the brain-damaged text “You? I find it on Google.” Clicking the link directs recipients to a page on online-photo-albums.org which, at the time, pointed to malware hosted on a server (now offline) based in Bosnia and Herzegovina. This installer drops no fewer than six payloads, including the “clickjacker” Trojan-Bamital, which redirects the […]

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Phisher Puts Antiphishing Tool in the Crosshairs

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A small-time Trojan has decided to butt heads with a big-time anti-phishing tool, and ended up with dirt on its face. The malware looks like a fairly generic clone of Trojan-Phisher-SABanks, with an extra feature that sounds like it might be a good selling point for cheap cybercrooks intent on stealing a few bank passwords for fun and profit. The trojan attempts to disable or delete parts of Trusteer’s Rapport anti-phishing software. And fails, miserably. One version of the Trojan drops, then executes, a batch file that attempts to delete the main application. Another drops a batch which targets a […]

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Facebook Spam Leads to Viagra Vendor, Drive-by Download

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Annoying as they are, the spam emails circulating that supposedly come from Facebook don’t merely lead the recipient to one of those so-called Canadian Pharmacy pill-vendor websites. They now come with a bonus: An infection, courtesy of a malicious iframe which attempts a series of exploits against the browser, Adobe Reader, and Adobe Flash in an attempt to push a drive-by download down to the victim’s PC. The messages, which say they come from a service called Facebook Notify (or, sometimes, just Facebook Service) inform the recipient that they’ve received a message. In order to read the message, the recipient […]

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Game Phishing Trojan Uses DirectX to Launch Itself

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PC gamers have a new threat to contend with, one that has your personal information in its crosshairs and you can’t dispatch with a sniper rifle or BFG9000: A Trojan designed to steal game passwords that uses Microsoft’s own graphics engine, DirectX, against you. The Trojan, which appears to have originated in China, modifies one or more of the DirectX driver files — such as DirectSound, Direct3D, or DirectDraw — so it only loads when Windows fires up the modified DirectX driver. Because DirectX is typically used by games, it means this sleeper cell Trojan activates when you fire up […]

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Fake Amazon.com Order Emails Bring a Trojany “Friend”

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An ongoing campaign where malware distributors use email spam to deliver dangerous programs to unwitting victims has begun to change its tune, switching the scam to incorporate different brands. In the latest scam, the message appears to be an order confirmation from Amazon.com for the purchase of an expensive consumer electronics item, or a contract (spelled, tellingly, “conract“) for expensive home improvement work, purportedly to be done on the recipient’s home. A few weeks ago, the emails switched from a “shipping confirmation” hook to one which claims the contents of the attachment include a code worth $50 on Apple’s iTunes […]

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Trojan Masquerades as iTunes Gift or Résumé

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If you received one or more email messages over the past week that claim to contain an attached gift certificate for the Apple iTunes store or an unsolicited résumé, you probably received the latest scam involving the Tacticlol downloader. The iTunes-themed spam messages use the forged return address of gifts.certificate@itunes.com and read, in part, You have received an iTunes Gift Certificate in the amount of $50.00. You can find your certificate code in the attachment below. The resume messages simply say Please review my CV, Thank you! — using the abbreviation for Curriculum Vitae, the British analogue to the word […]

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