Posts Categorized: Trojans


A Cave Monster from Hell Wants Your Financial Data

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A novel and pretty sneaky Trojan designed to steal financial data appeared on our radar screen last week. The Trojan, once installed on a victim’s computer, rootkits itself to prevent detection, then watches the victim’s browser for any attempt to connect to the secured, HTTPS login page of several online banks. When the victim visits the login page the Trojan has been waiting for, the Trojan generates a form that “hovers” over the login page asking for additional verification information. “In order to provide you with extra security, we occasionally need to ask for additional information when you access your […]

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Blackhat SEO of Google Images Links to Rogue AV

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Yesterday, a few of the Threat Research folks and I had a little fun playing with a hack that had, for one day at least, pretty much decimated Google’s Image Search feature. One researcher, who stumbled into the attack purely by chance, found that a Google Images link to a map of the United States was, instead, redirecting hapless Web surfers to pages that deliver an installer of a rogue antivirus in the Security Tool family of fine, fraudulent products. What really caught our interest was how the hack behaved, depending on the operating system and browser you used. With […]

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“Fingerprint” Helps Identify Malware Authors

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The Threat Research group sat in on a talk by HBGary CEO Greg Hoglund yesterday where the regular speaker discussed some research he’s been doing over the past year that he hopes will help connect malware samples to known groups of malware creators. While that sounds promising for law enforcement, it’s actually not as helpful for tracking down originators of malware for prosecution as it is for security researchers to preliminarily group and classify the masses of outwardly-dissimilar Trojans we see every day. In most conventional methods of classification, researchers look for programmatic similarities or behavioral characteristics as a way […]

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Weird Malware on Display at Black Hat

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I’m at the Black Hat Briefings this week, the annual confab of the best and brightest in computer security, catching up on the trends and tricks malware authors and data thieves employ. I just saw an impressive demo by a pair of security researchers who took a deep dive into the behaviors of four pieces of highly targeted malware. The researchers, Nicholas Percoco and Jibran Ilyas of Trustwave, ran a live demonstration of four Trojans designed to steal sensitive information and surreptitiously exfiltrate that data to the criminals. Three of the Trojans had been found installed on the servers of […]

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Beware Spam With HTML Attachments

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When it comes to spam messages, conventional wisdom dictates that you shouldn’t follow links or call phone numbers in the message, order products from the spammer, or open files attached to the email. We all should know by now that you should never open attached executable files, and spam filters now treat all .exe files as suspicious. When spammers began flooding inboxes with .zip files containing executables, we caught on pretty quickly as well. But HTML isn’t executable — it’s just plain text — so does that mean it’s safe to open attachments when they’re just HTML files? Hell no! […]

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Ransomware App Asks Victims to Pay a Phone Bill

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Ransomware is nothing new, but a Ukrainian ransomware Trojan that came over the transom last week demonstrated that the concept of “payment” can extend to services other than banking or finance. In this case, the Trojan (which we and several other AV companies call Trojan-Ransom-Krotten) thoroughly locks down the infected system then demands payment—in the form of credit paid to the Ukrainian mobile phone provider Kyivstar, which the victim then has to transfer to the malware distributor’s account. Yes, Alice, the hacker wants you to pay his cellphone bill. Once the ransomware has taken hold on a victim’s computer, it […]

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WoW Expansion Beta Likely to Spawn Phishers, Scams

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Blizzard’s announcement today that they will begin a closed beta-test for the latest expansion pack is likely to generate a lot of excitement among that particularly low breed of online criminals who steal the fruits of other people’s entertainment when they commandeer passwords for other players. While it’s hard to believe that most players of online games aren’t aware of the profusion of phishing sites attempting to steal logins, the problem clearly isn’t going away, so the warnings remain the same: Keep a close eye on your browser’s Address Bar, and make sure you’re really logging into Blizzard’s Web site, […]

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Keylogger Poses as Document from Spain’s Central Bank

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An attempt to push down the Trojan-Backdoor-Zbot password thief to Spaniards may signal a new wave of attacks by a crew of attackers who spent the better part of 2009 trying to convince gullible Internet users in different countries to download and execute Zbot installers poorly disguised as transaction records or other important financial documents. A bogus Banco de España (BdE) Web site came and went quickly last week, but not before we took a deep dive and came up with a mouthful of malware. Believe me, it tasted terrible. The page, designed to mimic closely the appearance of the […]

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Facebook “Photo Album” Spam Drops Trojans

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A spammed link campaign that spread through Facebook rapidly over the weekend delivered a malicious payload designed to take control of the Facebook account of any infected user, steal passwords, and hijack clicks in the victim’s browser. The messages appear as links sent by a friend, accompanied by the brain-damaged text “You? I find it on Google.” Clicking the link directs recipients to a page on online-photo-albums.org which, at the time, pointed to malware hosted on a server (now offline) based in Bosnia and Herzegovina. This installer drops no fewer than six payloads, including the “clickjacker” Trojan-Bamital, which redirects the […]

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Phisher Puts Antiphishing Tool in the Crosshairs

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A small-time Trojan has decided to butt heads with a big-time anti-phishing tool, and ended up with dirt on its face. The malware looks like a fairly generic clone of Trojan-Phisher-SABanks, with an extra feature that sounds like it might be a good selling point for cheap cybercrooks intent on stealing a few bank passwords for fun and profit. The trojan attempts to disable or delete parts of Trusteer’s Rapport anti-phishing software. And fails, miserably. One version of the Trojan drops, then executes, a batch file that attempts to delete the main application. Another drops a batch which targets a […]

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