Posts Categorized: Ransomware


Cryptolocker is not dead

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Recently in the news the FBI filed a status report updating on the court-authorized measures to neutralize GameOver Zeus and Cryptolocker. While the report states that “all or nearly all” of the active computers infected with GameOver Zeus have been liberated from the criminals’ control, they also stated that Cryptolocker is “effectively non-functional and unable to encrypt newly infected computers.” Their reasoning for this is that Cryptolocker has been neutralized by the disruption and cannot communicate with the command and control servers to receive instructions or send RSA keys after encryption. Read more here While seizing the majority of the […]

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Android.Koler – Android based ransomware

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Recently, a new Android threat named Android.Koler has begun popping up in the news.  According to an article by ARS Technica, it reacts similar to other pieces of ransomware often found on Windows machines.  A popup will appear and state “Your Android phone viewed illegal porn. To unlock it, pay a $300 fine”.  This nasty little piece of malware is infecting people who visit certain adult websites on their phone. The site claims you need to install a video player to view the adult content. Although I can’t say for sure since I haven’t seen the malicious sites, I’m guessing […]

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Cybercrime Trends 2013 – Year in Review

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It’s that time of the year! The moment when we reflect back on the cybercrime tactics, techniques and procedures (TTPs) that shaped 2013, in order to constructively speculate on what’s to come for 2014 in terms of fraudulent and malicious campaigns, orchestrated by opportunistic cybercriminal adversaries across the globe. Throughout 2013, we continued to observe and profile TTPs, which were crucial for the success, profitability and growth of the cybercrime ecosystem internationally, such as, for instance, widespread proliferation of the campaigns, professionalism and the implementation of basic business/economic/marketing concepts, improved QA (Quality Assurance), vertical integration in an attempt to occupy […]

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ThreatVlog Episode 6: FBI Ransomware forcing child porn on infected computers

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In this episode of the ThreatVlog, Marcus Moreno discusses a new, very malicious form of FBI Ransomware that forces the users of infected machines to look at illegal imagery, taking the scare tactics to the next level. He also discusses a new Javascript hack that takes over your browser temporarily, attempting to get people to pay for it to be unlocked.

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Top 5 Fake Security Rogues of 2013

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By Tyler Moffitt We see users on the internet getting infected with Rogue Security Malware all the time. In fact, it’s one of the most common and obvious type of infections we see. The Rogues lock-down your computer and prevent you from opening any applications so you’re forced to read their scam. Although they use various tactics and convincing GUIs to get onto your computer, they all share a common goal: To get your money.

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Managed ‘Russian ransomware’ as a service spotted in the wild

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By Dancho Danchev In 2013, you no longer need to posses sophisticated programming skills to manage a ransomware botnet, potentially tricking tens of thousands of gullible users, per day, into initiating a micro-payment to pay the ransom for having their PC locked down. You’ve got managed ransomware services doing it for you. In this post I’ll profile a recently spotted underground market proposition detailing the success story of a ransomware botnet master that’s been in business for over 4 years, claiming to be earning over five hundred thousands rubles per month. More details:

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Webroot’s Threat Blog Most Popular Posts for 2012

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It’s that time of the year! The moment when we look back, and reflect on Webroot’s Threat Blog most popular content for 2012. Which are this year’s most popular posts? What distinguished them from the rest of the analyses published on a daily basis, throughout the entire year? Let’s find out.

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How malware authors evade antivirus detection

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Aiming to ensure that their malware doesn’t end up in the hands of vendors and researchers, cybercriminals are actively experimenting with different quality assurance processes whose objective is to increase the probability of their campaigns successfully propagating in the wild without detection. Some of these techniques include multiple offline antivirus scanning interfaces offering the cybercriminal a guarantee that their malicious program would remain undetected, before they launch their malicious campaign in the wild. In the wild since 2006, Kim’s Multiple Antivirus Scanner is still actively used among cybercriminals wanting to ensure that their malicious software is pre-scanned against the signature-based scanning techniques […]

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Criminals Abuse Amazon Hosting with Rogues, Ransomware

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The criminals who push rogues at the world don’t really care about the reputations of the ISPs or Web hosting services they abuse. They leap from free service to free service until they’ve thoroughly worn out their welcome and, in some cases, destroyed the reputation of the service they abused. But they have behaved in one predictable way over the years: They’re stingy, and won’t pay for anything unless it’s absolutely necessary, despite the fact that they’re raking in cash by the boatload. But that seemed to change this week when we saw a number of Web sites pop up […]

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Removing Popureb Doesn’t Require a Windows Reinstall

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By Marco Giuliani Last Wednesday, Microsoft published a blog post detailing a significant update to a piece of malware named Popureb. The malware adds code to the Master Boot Record, or MBR, a region of the hard disk that’s read by the PC during bootup, long before the operating system has had a chance to get started. Researchers sometimes refer to these kinds of malware as bootkits, or a rootkit which loads at such a low level during the boot process that it is invisible to the operating system, and therefore very difficult to remove. Microsoft researcher Chun Feng detailed […]

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