Posts Categorized: Mobile security


5M+ harvested Russian mobile numbers service exposes fraudulent infrastructure

by

Cybercriminals continue adapting to the exponential penetration of mobile devices through the systematic release of DIY (do-it-yourself) mobile number harvesting tools, successfully setting up the foundations for commercial managed/on demand mobile phone number harvesting services, ultimately leading to an influx of mobile  malware/spam campaigns. In addition to boutique based DIY operations, sophisticated, ‘innovation’ and market development-oriented cybercriminals are actively working on the development of commercially available Android-based botnet generating tools, further fueling growth into the market segment. In a series of blog posts, we’ve been profiling multiple cybercrime-friendly services/malicious Android-based underground market releases, further highlighting the professionalization of the market […]

Continue Reading »

Fully automated, API-supporting service, undermines Facebook and Google’s ‘SMS/Mobile number activation’ account registration process

by

Operating in a world dominated by millions of malware-infected hosts acting as proxies for the facilitation of fraudulent and malicious activity, the Web’s most popular properties are constantly looking for ways to add additional layers of authentication to the account registration process of prospective users, in an attempt to undermine automatic account registration tactics. With CAPTCHA under automatic fire from newly emerging CAPTCHA solving/breaking services, re-positioning the concept from what was once the primary automatic account registration prevention mechanism, to just being a part of the ‘authentication mix’ these days, in recent years, a new (layered) authentication concept got the attention […]

Continue Reading »

SMS Trojans Using Adult Content On The Rise In Android

by

In the marketing world, it’s widely known sex sells. This is so true the “adult” industry is a multi-billion dollar industry. This is also why malware authors have long used adult content to attract unwitting victims. Lately, this threat researcher has seen way too much of it. There has been an influx of Trojan-like APKs using adult content to trick users into sending premium SMS messages. Let’s take a deeper look at one of these apps. When you open the app it displays a page showing “GET IT NOW” in the middle, and “NEXT” at the lower right corner. If […]

Continue Reading »

Cybercrime Trends 2013 – Year in Review

by

It’s that time of the year! The moment when we reflect back on the cybercrime tactics, techniques and procedures (TTPs) that shaped 2013, in order to constructively speculate on what’s to come for 2014 in terms of fraudulent and malicious campaigns, orchestrated by opportunistic cybercriminal adversaries across the globe. Throughout 2013, we continued to observe and profile TTPs, which were crucial for the success, profitability and growth of the cybercrime ecosystem internationally, such as, for instance, widespread proliferation of the campaigns, professionalism and the implementation of basic business/economic/marketing concepts, improved QA (Quality Assurance), vertical integration in an attempt to occupy […]

Continue Reading »

Master Key Bug Patch – Webroot SecureAnywhere Mobile Update on Google Play Now

by

By Nathan Collier Last Friday we blogged about the radical Android OS bug 8219321, better known as the “Master Key” bug, which was reported by Bluebox Security. Check out last weeks blog if you haven’t already: “The implications are huge!” – The Master Key Bug. We mentioned how we have been diligently working on protecting those not yet covered by patches or updates, and finding a solution for older devices as well. We are happy to report we have the solution! The newest version of Webroot SecureAnywhere Mobile with a patch for the “Master Key” bug can be found on the […]

Continue Reading »

“The implications are huge!” – The Master Key Bug *UPDATED*

by

By Nathan Collier and Cameron Palan Last week, Bluebox Security reported they’d found a new flaw with the Android OS, saying “The implications are huge!”. The bug, also known as the “Master Key” bug or “bug 8219321”, can be exploited as a way to modify Android application files, specifically the code within them, without breaking the cryptographic signature. We call these signatures the “digital certificate”, and they are used to verify the app’s integrity. Since the bug is able to modify an application and still have the certificate appear valid, it is a big deal.

Continue Reading »

Android.Bankun: Bank Information Stealing Application On Your Android Device

by

By Nathan Collier There’s one variant of Android.Bankun that is particularly interesting to me.  When you look at the manifest it doesn’t have even one permission.  Even wallpaper apps have internet permissions.  Having no permissions isn’t a red flag for being malicious though.  In fact, it may even make you lean towards it being legitimate. There is one thing that thing that gives Android.Bankun a red flag though.  The package name of com.google.bankun instantly makes me think something is fishy.  To the average user the word ‘Google’ is seen as a word to be trusted.  This is especially true when […]

Continue Reading »

Android.RoidSec: This app is an info stealing “sync-hole”!

by

Android.RoidSec has the package name “cn.phoneSync”, but an application name of “wifi signal Fix”. From a ‘Malware 101′ standpoint, you would think the creators would have a descriptive package name that matches the application name. Not so, in this case. So what is Android.RoidSec? It’s a nasty, malicious app that sits in the background (and avoids installing any launcher icon) while collecting all sorts of info-stealing goodness.

Continue Reading »

Android.TechnoReaper Downloader Found on Google Play

by

We have found a new threat we are calling Android.TechnoReaper. This malware has two parts: a downloader available on the Google Play Market and the spyware app it downloads. The downloaders are disguised as font installing apps, as seen below:

Continue Reading »