Posts Categorized: Threat Research


Newly launched ‘HTTP-based botnet setup as a service’ empowers novice cybercriminals with bulletproof hosting capabilities – part three

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In a series of blog posts throughout 2013, we emphasized on the lowering of the entry barriers into the world of cybercrime, largely made possible by the rise of managed services, the re-emergence of the DIY (do-it-yourself) trend, and the development of niche market segments, like the practice of setting up and offering bulletproof hosting for a novice cybercriminal’s botnet generating platform. The proliferation of these easy to use, once only found in the arsenal of tools of the sophisticated cybercriminals, tools, is the direct result of cybercrime ecosystem leaks, cracked/pirated versions, or a community-centered approach applied by their authors, […]

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Mobile Security 2014: Predictions

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The most recent and interesting threats we see are more or less “evolved” forms of previous threats, including those originating from the PC side. People have been “spoofing” parts of apps, such as code, appearance, or digital certificates, since Android malware first started appearing. The MasterKey exploit was a whole new way to modify the app without even having to spoof anything (since this was the exploit which allowed applications to be changed without invalidating the existing digital signature). It’s also very interesting to see how threats like Zitmo or RAT-type apps seem to get better and better at mirroring […]

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How cybercriminals efficiently violate YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, SoundCloud and Google+’s ToS

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With social media, now an inseparable part of the marketing expenditures for every modern organization, cybercriminals quickly adapted to the ongoing buzz, and over the last couple of years, have been persistently supplying the market segment with social media metrics performance boosts, in the the form of bogus likes, dislikes, comments, favorites, subscribers, and video/music plays. This process, largely made possible by the massively undermined CAPTCHA bot vs human verification practice, results in automatically registered accounts, or the persistent data mining of malware-infected hosts for accounting data for social media accounts, continues to scale, allowing both individuals and organizations to […]

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Malicious multi-hop iframe campaign affects thousands of Web sites, leads to a cocktail of client-side exploits – part two

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Ever since we exposed and profiled the evasive, multi-hop, mass iframe campaign that affected thousands of Web sites in November, we continued to monitor it, believing that the cybercriminal(s) behind it, would continue operating it, basically switching to new infrastructure once the one exposed in the post got logically blacklisted, thereby undermining the impact of the campaign internationally. Not surprisingly, we were right. The campaign is not only still proliferating, but the adversaries behind it have also (logically) switched the actual hosting infrastructure. Let’s dissect the currently active malicious iframe campaign that continues to serving a cocktail of (patched) client-side […]

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ThreatVlog Episode 11: Staying safe while doing holiday shopping online

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In this edition of the Webroot ThreatVlog, Grayson Milbourne talks about the threats that exist online in the holiday shopping craze. As more and more money is spent online, criminals are becoming more skilled at stealing all sorts of personal information, from credit card numbers to identifying credentials. As with all shopping, common sense is necessary, and with the tips and tricks provided, you will be even more protected while finding that perfect gift online.

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Compromised legitimate Web sites expose users to malicious Java/Symbian/Android “Browser Updates”

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We’ve just intercepted a currently active malicious campaign, relying on redirectors placed at compromised/hacked legitimate Web sites, for the purpose of hijacking the legitimate traffic and directly exposing it to multi mobile OS based malicious/fraudulent content. In this particular case, a bogus “Browser Update“, which in reality is a premium rate SMS malware.

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Today’s “massive” password breach: a Webroot perspective

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First, this is not a blog about a big corporate breach, or a massive new discovery.  Rather, the researchers at Trustwave gained access to a botnet controller interface (the C&C element of a botnet) known as Pony and revealed the data within. Not surprisingly, as the vast majority of botnets target user credentials, this controller had a good deal of data related to passwords. While 2 million passwords might seem like a lot, it is really a drop in the bucket compared to many recent breaches. Think about Adobe who lost a minimum of 28 million, but is rumored to […]

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Commercial Windows-based compromised Web shells management application spotted in the wild

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For years, whenever I needed a fresh sample of pharmaceutical scams, I always sampled the Web sites of major educational institutions, where a thriving ecosystem relying on compromised Web shells, continues to enjoy the high page ranks of the affected Web sites for blackhat SEO (search engine optimization) purposes. How are cybercriminals managing these campaigns? What type of tools and tactics do they use? In a cybercrime ecosystem that has logically migrated to Web-based platforms for a variety of reasons over the last couple of years, there are still those who’re keeping it old school, by releasing host-based DIY cybercrime-friendly […]

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Cybercrime-friendly VPN service provider pitches itself as being ‘recommended by Edward Snowden’

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We’ve recently spotted a multi-hop Russian cybercrime-friendly VPN service provider — ad featured not syndicated at a well known cybercrime-friendly community – that is relying on fake celebrity endorsement on its way to attract new customers, in this particular case, it’s pitching itself as being recommended by ex-NSA contractor Edward Snowden. How have anonymization tactics evolved over the last couple of years? Have the bad guys been ‘innovating’ on their way to cover the malicious/fraudulent online activity orchestrated by them? Let’d discuss some of the current trends in this ever-green market segment within the cybercrime ecosystem.

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