Posts Categorized: Uncategorized


TDL3 and ZeroAccess: More of the Same?

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By Marco Giuliani In our previous technical analysis of the ZeroAccess rootkit, we highlighted how it acts as a framework by infecting the machine — setting up its own private space in the disk, first through a dedicated file system on the disk, and more recently by using a hidden and locked directory. This is where the rootkit stores the modules it downloads from the command and control servers. Until now, the plugins we’ve monitored have been ad-clickers and search engine hijackers. We have also noted how the ZeroAccess rootkit acts very similar to the TDL3 rootkit, either by infecting […]

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Thre@t Reply: “Online Shopping” | Part 2 of 2

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In the second of a two-part series with Threat Research Analyst Grayson Milbourne, we answer a question about how to stay safe when shopping online. In the previous video, Grayson discussed how to identify a phishing page. In this episode, he continues his discussion by explaining how to tell whether the site you’re trying to purchase something from is operating safely and whether the site is able to protect your personal information when you click the “buy” button. [vimeo 23488027] As always, feel free to submit your security question to @webroot, or by email to blog (at) webroot (dot) com, or […]

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Malicious PHP Scripts on the Rise

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Last week, I gave a talk at the RSA Security Conference about malicious PHP scripts. For those who can’t attend the conference, I wanted to give you a glimpse into this world to which, until last year, I hadn’t paid much attention. My normal week begins with a quick scan of malware lists — URLs that point to new samples — that come from a variety of public sources. I started noticing an increasing number of non-executable PHP and Perl scripts appearing on those lists and decided to dig a little deeper. In a lot of ways, PHP is an […]

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A Cryptogram a Day Keeps the Malware Away

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As a child, one of my favorite daily pastimes was solving the cryptogram puzzle published in the LA Times (after my mom finished the crossword puzzle, of course). I used to plow through paperback word puzzle books obsessively, finishing them in days. Appropriately, a Trojan that popped onto my radar last week had me flexing my cryptogram muscles yet again. The Trojan is a fairly common game password stealer, and it wouldn’t have merited a second look except that it also runs through a few routines to disable various antivirus products sold exclusively in Korea. Most game phishing Trojans we […]

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New Year’s Drive-By Brings a Recursive Rogue

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On the morning of January 2nd, still bleary eyed, I checked my email to find a charming notification informing me that I’d received an electronic greeting card. Yay! I thought to myself: The first targeted malware of 2011 plopped right into my lap. I immediately pulled up my research machine, browsed to the URL in the message (don’t try this at home, kids), and found my test system swamped in malware. After classifying the files and their source URLs into our definitions — I didn’t want this to happen to you, after all — I turned the computer back off […]

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Software Channels the Cloud – For the Better

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By Ian Moyse, EMEA Channel Director I continue to read doom and gloom news about the future of the software distribution channel, in particular, how it’s being impacted by the global recession, by catalogue providers, and most importantly, the cloud security delivery model. We already know that cloud software will change the security landscape as we know it today, and it looks likely to change the software marketplace as well. In my opinion, this change is long needed, and for the better. Resellers who find the right education and support for transitioning to a mixed world with both traditional and […]

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Troublesome Trojan Trammels Torrent Sites

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We spotted an interesting behavior from a Trojan dropper that belongs to a family of malware named Ponmocup. The file, update.exe (MD5 89f4ea9f0240239e0d97f202d22af325) leaves behind a payload that, among other things, modifies the Hosts file on infected computers to prevent users from visiting popular Bittorrent sites, including The Pirate Bay. It’s an odd behavior for several reasons. We don’t see many Trojans modify the Hosts file anymore because such modifications are so easily reversed. But more to the point: Why would a criminal care whether anyone else be able to browse The Pirate Bay, a Web site known to host […]

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Cracked Trojan-Maker Infects Prospective Criminals

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In what seems to be a trend in my September blog posts, the research team has run across a program meant for criminally-minded people which has a nasty surprise inside. The program in question is called the ZombieM Bot Builder, which is used by the kind of upstanding citizens who spread Trojans in order to build up botnets — a collective of infected computers that can act as one entity. The creators of this program, an Argentinian group called Arhack, sell it for 180 euros. But don’t pull out your stolen credit cards just yet, because Arhack doesn’t take Visa: […]

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