Posts Categorized: Uncategorized


Non-executable malicious files and code – Thre@t Reply

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.exe, PHP, HTML, and the list goes on. How many different kinds of files and code can potentially infect your PC? Webroot threat research analyst Nathan Collier explains a few of the the types of potentially dangerous files, other than the common executable (.exe) that can be found on a Windows PC and cause harm to it. [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CFH8VxP7gmY] If you have a question you want answered by one of our threat experts send it to us! Comment below, tweets us (www.twitter.com/webroot), or email it to us (blog@webroot.com).

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CloudOnomics

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By Ian Moyse Moore’s Law back in 1965 predicted silicon power would double every two years. But what its creator, Gordon E. Moore, couldn’t have predicted was the dramatic economies of scale the cloud would eventually bring to all of our lives. For one, it’s helped lead to a drop in price for essentials like computing power and storage by making them more accessible. But also, it’s enabled conveniences no one ever would have imagined four or so decades ago. Today we’re able to use a mobile device with massive power and local storage to locate and download from virtually […]

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Mebromi: the first BIOS rootkit in the wild

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By Marco Giuliani In the past few weeks a Chinese security company called Qihoo 360 blogged about a new BIOS rootkit hitting Chinese computers. This turned to be a very interesting discovery as it appears to be the first real malware targeting system BIOS since a well-known proof of concept called IceLord in 2007. The malware is called Mebromi and contains a bit of everything: a BIOS rootkit specifically targeting Award BIOS, a MBR rootkit, a kernel mode rootkit, a PE file infector and a Trojan downloader. At this time, Mebromi is not designed to infect 64-bit operating system and it is not […]

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TDL3 and ZeroAccess: More of the Same?

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By Marco Giuliani In our previous technical analysis of the ZeroAccess rootkit, we highlighted how it acts as a framework by infecting the machine — setting up its own private space in the disk, first through a dedicated file system on the disk, and more recently by using a hidden and locked directory. This is where the rootkit stores the modules it downloads from the command and control servers. Until now, the plugins we’ve monitored have been ad-clickers and search engine hijackers. We have also noted how the ZeroAccess rootkit acts very similar to the TDL3 rootkit, either by infecting […]

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Thre@t Reply: “Online Shopping” | Part 2 of 2

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In the second of a two-part series with Threat Research Analyst Grayson Milbourne, we answer a question about how to stay safe when shopping online. In the previous video, Grayson discussed how to identify a phishing page. In this episode, he continues his discussion by explaining how to tell whether the site you’re trying to purchase something from is operating safely and whether the site is able to protect your personal information when you click the “buy” button. [vimeo 23488027] As always, feel free to submit your security question to @webroot, or by email to blog (at) webroot (dot) com, or […]

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Malicious PHP Scripts on the Rise

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Last week, I gave a talk at the RSA Security Conference about malicious PHP scripts. For those who can’t attend the conference, I wanted to give you a glimpse into this world to which, until last year, I hadn’t paid much attention. My normal week begins with a quick scan of malware lists — URLs that point to new samples — that come from a variety of public sources. I started noticing an increasing number of non-executable PHP and Perl scripts appearing on those lists and decided to dig a little deeper. In a lot of ways, PHP is an […]

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A Cryptogram a Day Keeps the Malware Away

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As a child, one of my favorite daily pastimes was solving the cryptogram puzzle published in the LA Times (after my mom finished the crossword puzzle, of course). I used to plow through paperback word puzzle books obsessively, finishing them in days. Appropriately, a Trojan that popped onto my radar last week had me flexing my cryptogram muscles yet again. The Trojan is a fairly common game password stealer, and it wouldn’t have merited a second look except that it also runs through a few routines to disable various antivirus products sold exclusively in Korea. Most game phishing Trojans we […]

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New Year’s Drive-By Brings a Recursive Rogue

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On the morning of January 2nd, still bleary eyed, I checked my email to find a charming notification informing me that I’d received an electronic greeting card. Yay! I thought to myself: The first targeted malware of 2011 plopped right into my lap. I immediately pulled up my research machine, browsed to the URL in the message (don’t try this at home, kids), and found my test system swamped in malware. After classifying the files and their source URLs into our definitions — I didn’t want this to happen to you, after all — I turned the computer back off […]

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Software Channels the Cloud – For the Better

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By Ian Moyse, EMEA Channel Director I continue to read doom and gloom news about the future of the software distribution channel, in particular, how it’s being impacted by the global recession, by catalogue providers, and most importantly, the cloud security delivery model. We already know that cloud software will change the security landscape as we know it today, and it looks likely to change the software marketplace as well. In my opinion, this change is long needed, and for the better. Resellers who find the right education and support for transitioning to a mixed world with both traditional and […]

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