Posts Tagged: Keyloggers


Today’s “massive” password breach: a Webroot perspective

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First, this is not a blog about a big corporate breach, or a massive new discovery.  Rather, the researchers at Trustwave gained access to a botnet controller interface (the C&C element of a botnet) known as Pony and revealed the data within. Not surprisingly, as the vast majority of botnets target user credentials, this controller had a good deal of data related to passwords. While 2 million passwords might seem like a lot, it is really a drop in the bucket compared to many recent breaches. Think about Adobe who lost a minimum of 28 million, but is rumored to […]

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ThreatVlog Episode 2: Keyloggers and your privacy

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Commercial and black hat keyloggers can infect any device, from your PC at home to the phone in your hand.  What exactly are these programs trying to steal?  How can this data be used harmfully against you?  And what can you do to protect all your data and devices from this malicious data gathering?  In this episode of Webroot ThreatVlog, Grayson Milbourne talks about security, your data, and protecting yourself. [youtube=http://youtu.be/BvBybxTCicU] Did you miss the first episode?  Be sure to check it out here:  http://blog.webroot.com/2013/08/20/tor-and-apple-exploits-revealed/

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Weird Malware on Display at Black Hat

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I’m at the Black Hat Briefings this week, the annual confab of the best and brightest in computer security, catching up on the trends and tricks malware authors and data thieves employ. I just saw an impressive demo by a pair of security researchers who took a deep dive into the behaviors of four pieces of highly targeted malware. The researchers, Nicholas Percoco and Jibran Ilyas of Trustwave, ran a live demonstration of four Trojans designed to steal sensitive information and surreptitiously exfiltrate that data to the criminals. Three of the Trojans had been found installed on the servers of […]

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Stepping up to the Loserbar

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Last year, we at Webroot (as well as many other people) saw a huge spike in two specific types of malware: Rogue antispyware products — the ineffective, deceptive kind — and the various tricks the companies that sell rogues use to trick you into downloading (and eventually buying) their bogus products, something we refer to, generally, as Fakealerts. Here’s usually how the trick works: First, you’re fooled into browsing to a Web site which employs any of a number of tricks to install the Fakealert code onto your PC. The Fakealert then begins popping up messages warning you about some […]

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