Posts Tagged: security


Cybercriminals offer fellow cybercriminals training in Operational Security (OPSEC)

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In need of a fresh example that malicious and fraudulent adversaries continue professionalizing, and standardizing demanded cybercrime-friendly products and services, all for the sake of monetizing their experience and expertise in the profitable world of cybercrime? Publicly launched around the middle of 2013, a product/training course targeting novice cybercriminals is offering them a manual, recommendations for open source/free software, as well as access to a private forum set up for customers only, enlightening them to everything a cybercriminals needs to know in order to stay secure and anonymous online. The standardized OPSEC offering is targeting novice cybercriminals, and also has […]

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Newly launched ‘HTTP-based botnet setup as a service’ empowers novice cybercriminals with bulletproof hosting capabilities – part three

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In a series of blog posts throughout 2013, we emphasized on the lowering of the entry barriers into the world of cybercrime, largely made possible by the rise of managed services, the re-emergence of the DIY (do-it-yourself) trend, and the development of niche market segments, like the practice of setting up and offering bulletproof hosting for a novice cybercriminal’s botnet generating platform. The proliferation of these easy to use, once only found in the arsenal of tools of the sophisticated cybercriminals, tools, is the direct result of cybercrime ecosystem leaks, cracked/pirated versions, or a community-centered approach applied by their authors, […]

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Malicious multi-hop iframe campaign affects thousands of Web sites, leads to a cocktail of client-side exploits – part two

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Ever since we exposed and profiled the evasive, multi-hop, mass iframe campaign that affected thousands of Web sites in November, we continued to monitor it, believing that the cybercriminal(s) behind it, would continue operating it, basically switching to new infrastructure once the one exposed in the post got logically blacklisted, thereby undermining the impact of the campaign internationally. Not surprisingly, we were right. The campaign is not only still proliferating, but the adversaries behind it have also (logically) switched the actual hosting infrastructure. Let’s dissect the currently active malicious iframe campaign that continues to serving a cocktail of (patched) client-side […]

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Compromised legitimate Web sites expose users to malicious Java/Symbian/Android “Browser Updates”

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We’ve just intercepted a currently active malicious campaign, relying on redirectors placed at compromised/hacked legitimate Web sites, for the purpose of hijacking the legitimate traffic and directly exposing it to multi mobile OS based malicious/fraudulent content. In this particular case, a bogus “Browser Update“, which in reality is a premium rate SMS malware.

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Commercial Windows-based compromised Web shells management application spotted in the wild

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For years, whenever I needed a fresh sample of pharmaceutical scams, I always sampled the Web sites of major educational institutions, where a thriving ecosystem relying on compromised Web shells, continues to enjoy the high page ranks of the affected Web sites for blackhat SEO (search engine optimization) purposes. How are cybercriminals managing these campaigns? What type of tools and tactics do they use? In a cybercrime ecosystem that has logically migrated to Web-based platforms for a variety of reasons over the last couple of years, there are still those who’re keeping it old school, by releasing host-based DIY cybercrime-friendly […]

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Cybercrime-friendly VPN service provider pitches itself as being ‘recommended by Edward Snowden’

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We’ve recently spotted a multi-hop Russian cybercrime-friendly VPN service provider — ad featured not syndicated at a well known cybercrime-friendly community – that is relying on fake celebrity endorsement on its way to attract new customers, in this particular case, it’s pitching itself as being recommended by ex-NSA contractor Edward Snowden. How have anonymization tactics evolved over the last couple of years? Have the bad guys been ‘innovating’ on their way to cover the malicious/fraudulent online activity orchestrated by them? Let’d discuss some of the current trends in this ever-green market segment within the cybercrime ecosystem.

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Fake ‘October’s Billing Address Code’ (BAC) form themed spam campaign leads to malware

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Have you received a casual-sounding email enticing you into signing a Billing Address Code (BAC) form for October, in order for the Payroll Manager to proceed with the transaction? Based on our statistics, tens of thousands of users received these malicious spam emails over the last 24 hours, with the cybercriminal(s) behind them clearly interested in expanding the size of their botnet through good old fashioned ‘casual social engineering’ campaigns.

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Fake ‘MMS Gallery’ notifications impersonate T-Mobile U.K, expose users to malware

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Over the last two months, we’ve been closely monitoring — and proactively protecting from — the malicious campaigns launched by cybercriminals who are no strangers to the concept of social engineering topic rotation. Their purpose is to extend a campaign’s life cycle, or to generally increase a botnet’s infected population by spamming out tens of thousands of fake emails, exposing users to malicious software. The most recent campaign launched by the same cybercriminal(s), is once again impersonating T-Mobile U.K in an attempt to trick mobile users into thinking that they’ve received a legitimate MMS Gallery notification. In reality though, once the […]

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Cybercriminals impersonate HSBC through fake ‘payment e-Advice’ themed emails, expose users to malware

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HSBC customers, watch what you execute on your PCs. A circulating malicious spam campaign attempts to socially engineer you into thinking that you’ve received a legitimate ‘payment e-Advice’. In reality, once you execute the attachment, your PC automatically joins the botnet operated by the cybercriminal(s) behind the campaign.

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