Posts Tagged: Webroot blog


An update to the Target breach theory.

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It was brought to our attention that the research published had flaws. To read our response, please click here: https://community.webroot.com/t5/Security-Industry-News/Update-to-the-Target-breach-theory/m-p/77825

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Top consumer security predictions for 2014

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Top Predictions for 2014 FBI/ICE MoneyPak Cryptolocker Rogues As this year comes to a close we’ve seen some measurable progress on the infiltration techniques for malware. We’re going to give you some insight into some of the top threats of 2013 and what it could mean for 2014. FBI/ICE MoneyPak   We saw some frightening improvements with Ransomware this year. FBI/ICE MoneyPak or Win32.Reveton was a huge hit to the PC community. Although first seen in 2012 it wasn’t until 2013 that it was tweaked to be one of the most annoying and difficult Ransomware to remove. Once dropped on your […]

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Today’s “massive” password breach: a Webroot perspective

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First, this is not a blog about a big corporate breach, or a massive new discovery.  Rather, the researchers at Trustwave gained access to a botnet controller interface (the C&C element of a botnet) known as Pony and revealed the data within. Not surprisingly, as the vast majority of botnets target user credentials, this controller had a good deal of data related to passwords. While 2 million passwords might seem like a lot, it is really a drop in the bucket compared to many recent breaches. Think about Adobe who lost a minimum of 28 million, but is rumored to […]

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How do we use, secure, and share the information that surrounds us?

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The mobile landscape has boomed in the last couple of years mostly in part because of Android devices and social networking. This has opened the door for everyone to have access to a smartphone and have the cyber world at their fingertips. Smartphones have become an extension of us, and we now have our email, banking, social networking, television and internet on the go. We live in a world of instant access. With this excitement and convenience, we may lose track something we take serious is our privacy and security. Looming in this mobile landscape are people who want benefit […]

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French Android Users Hit again by SMS Trojan

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Earlier this year, the SMS Trojan Foncy was discovered targeting French-speaking Android Users. Now, we’ve come across a new Trojan targeting them using a similar SMS scam.  The app pretends to be an app called BlackMart Alpha, which is already a little shady since it’s used to download apps that may otherwise cost money. This app is not found on Google Play and is not malicious in itself, but the fact that you can’t get it in the Google Play store makes it a prefect target for malware developers to make fake versions of it. Webroot detects this Trojan as […]

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Thre@t Reply: “Online Shopping” | Part 2 of 2

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In the second of a two-part series with Threat Research Analyst Grayson Milbourne, we answer a question about how to stay safe when shopping online. In the previous video, Grayson discussed how to identify a phishing page. In this episode, he continues his discussion by explaining how to tell whether the site you’re trying to purchase something from is operating safely and whether the site is able to protect your personal information when you click the “buy” button. [vimeo 23488027] As always, feel free to submit your security question to @webroot, or by email to blog (at) webroot (dot) com, or […]

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Thre@t Reply: “Online Shopping” | Part 1 of 2

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In the latest Thre@t Reply video, Threat Research Analyst Grayson Milbourne answers a reader’s question about how to avoid being phished. The first step is to be able to identify whether you’re on the legitimate Web site you think you are, and if you’re not, what are the telltale signs that indicate you may be looking at a fake site designed solely to steal your user account and password information. [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KklPP891bZ8] To see the second half of the video, or any of our other video replies to reader questions, check out this post or visit the Webroot channels on YouTube […]

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Botnet malware targets MyYearbook

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The team here at Webroot has picked up on a Trojan that appears to target a relatively new social networking site: MyYearbook.com. The site caters to the high-school-age crowd with activities that include various kinds of person-to-person challenges, streaming TV, and a kind of virtual matchmaker service for the tween-and-above set. We’re calling the malware that targets the site Trojan-Myblot. We received our copy via a malicious BitTorrent download, which purportedly distributed a Windows utility. Instead, we received a file that downloaded several payloads, eventually landing our infected system firmly in the clutches of Myblot. So what does it do? The trojan, […]

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Phishing Trojan Targets Russian Finance Websites

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For a long time, we’ve heard about phishing attacks originating in Russia or eastern Europe that target western banks. There’s nothing surprising there. Latter-day Willie Suttons typically target big US or European banks because, well, that’s where the money is. That’s why I was kind of surprised to stumble across a phishing Trojan that targets some of Russia’s largest online financial Web sites, including RBK Money (formerly known as RUPay), Yandex, Moneymail, and OSMP — one of Russia’s Paypal-alternatives. Aside from e-gold, I hadn’t seen this many Russia-specific websites listed as targets within a phishing trojan before. Is Russia suddenly “where […]

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Inane Shenanigans with Worm-Shiv

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It’s been a long time since I’ve worked on a malware file as singularly obnoxious as Worm-Shiv, a new worm we defined a few weeks ago. There isn’t anything especially technically avant-garde or advanced about the worm, nor was it especially difficult to detect or remove. It just exhibits behavior that, to be blunt, is about as annoying as it possibly can be. The infection process starts with a small self-extracting RAR archive executable. When run, it drops and executes another .exe file, which in turn drops and executes yet another .exe file. Sounds pretty unobtrusive so far, right? Well, […]

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