Posts Tagged: Worm-Koobface


Epic Malware Dropper Makes No Attempt to Hide

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In the world of first-person shooter games, getting the most headshots – hits on the opponent which instantly take the opponent’s avatar out of the game — is a prized goal. The headshot is the quickest way to dispatch a foe in virtually every shooter, which is why the file name of a malware sample, currently in circulation, stood out. The file, yogetheadshot.php.exe (VT), is a dropper, a glorified bucket designed to tip over and spill other malware all over a PC. But where other droppers might leave behind a handful of payloads, this one utterly decimated a testbed PC […]

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Fake Flash Update Needs Flash to Work

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If you live in the US, you may have played sports, barbequed, or enjoyed the last long weekend of the summer outside doing something fun outdoors. Unfortunately, that wasn’t an option here in Boulder, where a large wildfire generated a thick plume of smoke and ash. So, what’s a malware analyst to do indoors on a beautiful day with toxic smoke outside? Why, spend some quality time with Koobface, of course. I took a closer look at the worm’s behavior and also noted that, since the Migdal keylogger site went dark for the Koobface crew, they’ve switched to using a […]

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Pro-Israel Website Receives Passwords Stolen by Koobface

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Is the team behind the Koobface worm taking a stance on the Israeli-Palestinian peace talks, or is this notorious worm’s most recent, bizarre twist just a coincidence? We’ve seen Koobface hijack legitimate Web sites for more than a year, using them not only to host malicious payload files, but also to work as proxy command-and-control servers for the botnet. One such hijacked Web domain, migdal.org.il, popped up in a number of blog posts and on Web sites which list the domains used to host malware, as far back as this past May, when the Koobface crew began using a slew […]

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A Look Back at the Worst Infections of 2009

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It’s not clear whether the past year will go down in history as a particularly bad year for malware, but one thing is certain: It was bad enough, at times, that fighting infections and cleaning PCs took priority over virtually all other work. Neither home users nor businesses were immune from wave after wave of increasingly nasty malware tricks, though there were a few bright spots: A fix issued by Microsoft mid-year meant that worms are far less likely to be able to spread using portable storage like thumbdrives or digital photo frames; A corresponding dropoff in overall worm detections […]

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