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With job growth projected to surge 24% over the next seven years, software engineering is one of the most demanded professional fields in the U.S. Exceptionally competitive pay and the chance to pursue careers across many industries are just a few benefits of being a software engineer.

We explore how software engineers working in cybersecurity face unique challenges and opportunities in our sit down with Fred Yip, Manager of Software Development in Webroot’s San Diego office.

Besides this sunny San Diego weather, what gets you out of bed and into the office?

I’m surrounded everyday by smart people who want to do their best to solve customer problems. There is a lot to do, but the work is very engaging and rewarding. My favorite part of the job is working closely with my team to deliver products to our customers. We work in a startup-like environment. Everyone wears many hats: as software developer, as tester, DevOps engineer, and customer support. 

There are many industries that demand your talent, what drew you to cybersecurity?

Cyberattacks are a rising trend. I used to work for an enterprise serving Fortune 500 companies. Knowing that cyberattacks affect everybody, I saw an opportunity to bring my skillset to Webroot. We extend our product to small and mid-sized businesses as well as consumers, which gives me the satisfaction of building a top-notch technology for anyone who needs it, whether it be a doctor’s office, coffee shop, or someone walking down the street.

What does a week of life at Webroot look like for you? 

A typical week for a manager is not much different than that of a team member. We do software development, testing, and deployment of product features as a team. I help design and implement the cloud infrastructure that supports our software components as microservices. In addition, I look out for the well-being of each team member in terms of technical, personal, and career development. 

What skills and traits do you look when hiring software engineers?

As an engineer, you have to be a team player, not self-focused. I look for a lot of integrity and honesty about what they are doing and what they know and don’t know. An eager attitude toward learning is important because it allows them to solve problems and contribute to the team. When they bring their best character and performance, they help to build a strong team. As long as someone has some relevant experience, they can always learn the technical skills. And an ability to learn new things quickly is another thing I always look for in a potential team member.  

Are there any outside activities that you and your team are involved in?

We attended a coding challenge at UC San Diego earlier this year, where we host students for a friendly competition. It was very high energy and there was a lot of participation. It was a fun challenge beyond just writing code. You could actually see the code working against others and the top winner was recognized after we gave out prizes. I always tell candidates to participate in the event, it’s a way to motivate them to join our team!

Check out Highlights from the UCSD Coding Challenge

Austin Castle

About the Author

Austin Castle

Social Media Manager

Austin Castle has explored the intersections of people and technology for 10 years. As social media manager, he creates a range of marketing and editorial content for Webroot’s global audience.

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