March 15, 2012 By Dancho Danchev

Spamvertised ‘Google Pharmacy’ themed emails lead to pharmaceutical scams

Cybercriminals are currently spamvertising a Google-themed email campaign that’s enticing home and corporate PC users  into clicking on bogus link leading to pharmaceutical scams.

More details:

The spamvertised campaign is brand-jacking Google’s brand, and trying to socially engineer users into thinking that Google has launched a new pharmacy interface in an attempt to take advantage of the trusted relati0nship that that company has already established with its users.

Sample subject: Improbable Drug Store reductions

Sample message: We’ve just launched a pharmaceutical interfaces for Google, as well as several new features that will improve the Google experience for the people buying pills and using pharmaceutical interfaces. We are really plased to have worked on a launch that will help people use pharmacy and surgery.  We are currently working on make it available to even more users with more language interfaces.

Sample URL: hxxp://iledrugs.com

In an attempt to bypass anti-spam filters, spammers have chosen to use an image file containing the message of the email, instead of using plain simple characters which could have triggered an anti-spam mechanism.

Avoid interacting with the emails if you receive one, and report them as spam/fraudulent as soon as you see it.

You can find more about Dancho Danchev at his LinkedIn Profile. You can also follow him on  Twitter.

Share Button

Trackbacks

  1. […] concept of anonymity, a customer could easily request the design of spam templates impersonating Google, Facebook, USPS, LinkedIn, U.S Airways, or Verizon […]

  2. […] on web sites with high page rank, the impersonation of legitimate brands, to the development of co-branding campaigns, pharmaceutical scammers persistently rotate the traffic acquisition tactics in an attempt to trick […]

  3. […] into clicking on the links found in legitimately looking emails. In the past, we’ve seen fake Google Pharmacies, emails once again impersonating YouTube and Twitter, as well as Facebook Inc. in an attempt to add […]

true