Industry Intel

Unexpected Side Effects: How COVID-19 Affected our Click Habits

Phishing has been around for ages and continues to be one of the most common threats that businesses and home users face today. But it’s not like we haven’t all been hearing about the dangers of phishing for years. So why do people still click? That’s what we wanted...

Key Considerations When Selecting a Web Classification Vendor

Since launching our web classification service in 2006, we’ve seen tremendous interest in our threat and web classification services, along with an evolution of the types and sizes of cybersecurity vendors and service providers looking to integrate this type of...

4 Ways MSPs Can Fine-Tune Their Cybersecurity Go-To-Market Strategy

Today’s work-from-home environment has created an abundance of opportunities for offering new cybersecurity services in addition to your existing business. With cyberattacks increasing in frequency and sophistication, business owners and managers need protection now...

Ransomware: The Bread and Butter of Cybercriminals

Imagine a thief walks into your home and rummages through your personal belongings. But instead of stealing them, he locks all your valuables into a safe and forces you to pay a ransom for the key to unlock the safe. What choice do you have? Substitute your digital...

Cyber News Rundown: Dairy Farm Ransomware

Dairy farm group faces $30 million ransom

The Dairy Farm Group, one of the largest retailers in Asia, has suffered a ransomware attack by the REvil group, which has demanded a roughly $30 million ransom. The attack is still ongoing nearly nine days after being first identified. The attackers still have full control over the company’s email systems, which they will likely use for additional phishing attacks or identity theft operations. Officials have confirmed the attack was isolated to a small number of devices, but they have not been able to stop the continuing transmission of data to the attacker’s systems.

Norway to fine dating app over user data sharing

The dating app Grindr will receive a fine from Norwegian government for sharing user data with several of their advertising partners. Multiple complaints were made against the app in the past year for making users accept their license agreement without being able to opt out of third-party data sharing. The fine equates to $11.7 million, or nearly 10 percent of Grindr’s annual revenue.

Multiple zero-day exploits patched by Apple

Apple has just released patches for three zero-day iOS exploits that may have already been used. Two of the exploits involved remote execution through a vulnerability in their WebKit browser, while the other could have been used to elevate privileges on multiple devices. An unknown researcher is responsible for bringing these vulnerabilities to Apple’s attention and likely received compensation through their bug bounty program.

Global authorities take down Emotet botnet

In the wake of a push earlier this week by global law enforcement, authorities have gained control of the servers responsible for operating the infamous Emotet botnet. This organization was responsible for infecting millions of devices across the world and using them to further the devastating spread. Police in Ukraine have also arrested individuals who face up to 12 years for their involvement in criminal activities. Emotet started out as a banking trojan but has since become an entry point for other ransomware variants.

Austrian crane manufacturer hit by ransomware

The Palfinger Group, which owns companies in 30 countries around the world, has recently fallen victim to a ransomware attack. For the past three days the organization has been under a steady assault on their networks, causing major issues with email communications and other crucial internal systems. It is still unclear on how the attack was initiated or the extent of the damage since the attack is ongoing.

Cyber News Rundown: Cryptomining Malware Resurgent

Skyrocketing Bitcoin prices prompt resurgence in mining malware

As the price of the cryptocurrency Bitcoin pushes record highs, there’s been a corresponding resurgence in cryptomining malware. Illicit miners had slipped off the radar as Bitcoin’s value plummeted in recent years, but now authors are hoping to profit off the latest price increase. Researchers have identified multiple forms of cryptominers, from browser-based applications to fileless script miners used against a variety of system configurations.

Major increase in malicious vaccine-related domains

The number of domains containing the word “vaccine” has increased 94.8% in the month since the first COVID-19 vaccine became publicly available. As with malicious COVID-related domains registered since March of last year, cybercriminals are taking advantage of the pandemic’s hold over the public’s consciousness in order to turn a profit. With over 2,000 new domains with COVID-related keywords, finding accurate and reliable information has become more difficult.

Millions of Nitro PDF user records leaked

A database containing over 77 million user records belonging to Nitro PDF has been found available for almost nothing on a dark web marketplace. The data was leaked in an October data breach, which Nitro confirmed, and was bundled for auction with a high price tag. Now, several months later, a member of the hacking group ShinyHunters has released access to the download link for a mere $3.

Scottish environmental agency falls victim to ransomware attack

Officials for the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency (SEPA) have confirmed that data stolen in a ransomware attack last month has been posted for sale on the dark web by the group responsible for the Conti ransomware variant. While it remains unclear how the attackers gained access to the agency’s systems, many of the infected systems are still not operational and have timetable for a return to service.

Hackers leak nearly 2 million Pixlr records

The ShinyHunters hacking group posted a database containing nearly 2 million user records for the Pixlr photo editing application to the web in recent days. The group claims to have stolen the database during a breach at another photo site, 123rf. Both sites are owned by the company Inmagine. Though Pixlr has yet to confirm the breach, it’s recommended users change passwords on Pixlr and any other sites sharing the same login credentials.

Cyber News Rundown: Gaming Industry in Crosshairs of Cybercriminals

Top gaming companies positioned to be next major cyberattack target

After healthcare and higher education emerged as lucrative targets for cyberattacks in 2020, researchers have identified the video gaming industry as another key target. By scouring the dark web for stolen data belonging to any of the top 25 largest gaming firms, over a million unique and newly uploaded accounts were discovered. Additionally, researchers found credentials for over 500,000 gaming company employees exposed in previous data breaches but used for multiple accounts.

Hardcoded backdoors discovered in Zyxel devices

Researchers recently stumbled upon an undocumented admin account on multiple Zyxel devices using basic login credentials and granting full access to devices commonly used to monitor internet traffic. This vulnerability was first spotted when several warnings for unauthorized login attempts were identified using admin/admin as the username and password, presumably in hopes of accessing other unprotected devices on the network. This undocumented account can only be viewed through an SSH connection or a web interface and could be an issue for over 100,000 Zyxel devices currently connected to the internet.

Vodafone operation reveals major data breach

Vodafone’s budget operators ho. Mobile has revealed their systems were compromised late last month and a database containing sensitive information belonging to nearly 2.5 million customers was leaked. Along with personally identifiable information is data related to customer SIM-cards, which can be used to enable SIM-swap attacks that allow attackers to control specific users’ messaging services. The stolen database has been for sale on a dark web for a starting price of $50,000 since shortly after the attack was discovered.

ElectroRAT quietly steals cryptocurrency across multiple operating systems

After operating for nearly a year the silent cryptocurrency stealer ElectroRAT has finally been identified using multiple different Trojanized apps to operate on Windows, Mac and Linux systems. To make these malicious apps appear more credible, authors placed advertisments on social media and cryptocurrency-related websites that have led to thousands of installations. By spreading the attack across multiple different operating systems, the attackers increased their chances of accessing information of value.

Vancouver’s TransLink Suffers Ransomware Attack

Nearly a month after officials identified technical issues with IT systems at Metro Vancouver’s TransLink transportation authority, the interruption was discovered to be the work of the Egregor Ransomware group. While the attack didn’t compromise customer data, it is believed that employee banking and personal information was stolen. TransLink employees are working to restore systems to proper functionality, though some seem to have been more damaged than others.

Maze Ransomware is Dead. Or is it?

“It’s definitely dead,” says Tyler Moffitt, security analyst at Carbonite + Webroot, OpenText companies. “At least,” he amends, “for now.”

Maze ransomware, which made our top 10 list for Nastiest Malware of 2020 (not to mention numerous headlines throughout the last year), was officially shut down in November of 2020. The ransomware group behind it issued a kind of press release, announcing the shutdown and that they had no partners or successors who would be taking up the mantle. But before that, Maze had been prolific and successful. In fact, shortly before the shutdown, Maze accounted for an estimated 12% of all successful ransomware attacks. So why did they shut down?

I sat down with Tyler to get his take on the scenario and find out whether Maze is well and truly gone.

Why do you think Maze was so successful?

Maze had a great business model. They were the group that popularized the breach leak/auction website. So, they didn’t just steal and encrypt your files like other ransomware; they threatened to expose the data for all to see or even sell it at auction.

Why was this shift so revolutionary?

The Maze group tended to target pretty huge organizations with 10,000 employees or more. Businesses that big are likely to have decent backups, so just taking the data and holding it for ransom isn’t much of an incentive.

Now think about this: those huge businesses also would’ve been subject to pricey fines for data breaches because of regulations like GDPR; and they’re also more likely to have big budgets to pay a ransom. So, instead of simply saying, “we have your data, pay up,” they said, “we have your data and if you don’t pay, we’ll expose it to the world – which includes the regulators and your customers.” Most of the time, paying the ransom is going to be the more cost effective (and less embarrassing) option. We don’t know if the Maze group invented this tactic, but they definitely set the trend, and a bunch of other ransomware groups started following it.

Other than the leak sites, did they do anything else noteworthy or different from other groups?

One of the bigger threat trends we saw in 2020 was malware groups partnering up for different pieces of the infection chain, such as Trojans, backdoors, droppers, etc. The botnet Emotet, for example, was responsible for a huge percentage of ransomware infections from various different groups. Maze, however, was pretty self-contained. We saw them working with a few other groups throughout 2020, but they had their own malspam campaign for delivery and everything else they needed in-house, so to speak. They were like a one-stop shop.

Do you think the move to remote work during the pandemic contributed to their success?

Absolutely, though you could say that about any ransomware group. Phishing and RDP attacks really ramped up when people started working from home. Home networks and personal devices are generally much less secure than corporate ones, and cybercriminals are always looking for ways to exploit a given situation for their gain.

If Maze was doing so well, why did they shut down?

Probably because they’d gotten too much attention. The more notoriety you get, the harder it is to operate. We see this with a lot of malware groups. They shut down for a while, either to lie low because the heat is on, or to just spend the money they’ve gotten from their payouts and enjoy life. Or, sometimes, they don’t lie low at all but just rebrand themselves under a new name. Either way, they tend to come back. For example, a ransomware variant called Ryuk went dark and came back as Conti. Emotet went away for a long time too and then came back under the same group name.

How can you tell when an old group has rebranded?

Unless they announce it in some way, the only way to really tell is if you can get a sample of the malware and reverse engineer it and look at the code. One of our threat researchers did that with a sample of Sodinokibi and discovered it had “GandCrab version 6” in its code. So, that’s an example of a rebrand, but it can be hard to spot.

Do you think Maze is done for good?

Not a chance. They attacked huge targets and got massive payouts. Most ransomware groups attack smaller businesses who are less likely to have strong enough security measures. Even the ones that targeted larger corporations, like Ryuk, still attacked businesses one-fifth the size of a typical Maze target. Now, the Maze group can relax and take a lavish vacation with all the money they got. But I’d be pretty shocked if they just abandoned such a winning business model entirely.

The verdict: Maze may be gone for now, but experts are fairly certain we haven’t seen the last of this virulent and highly successful malware group. In the meantime, Tyler advises businesses everywhere to use the lull as an opportunity to batten down their cyber resilience strategies by implementing layered security measures, locking down RDP, and educating employees on cybersecurity and risk avoidance.

Stay tuned for more ransomware developments right here on the Webroot blog.

Cyber News Rundown: Trickbot Spreads Via Subway Emails

Trickbot spreading through Subway company emails

Customers of Subway U.K. have been receiving confirmation emails for recent orders that instead contain malicious links for initiating Trickbot malware downloads. Subway has since disclosed that it discovered unauthorized access to several of its servers, which then launched the campaign. Users who do click on the malicious link initiate a process in Task Manager that can be stopped to prevent additional illicit activities typical of Trickbot infections.

Scores of municipal websites attacked in Lithuania

At least 22 websites belonging to various municipalities in Lithuania were compromised after a sophisticated cyberattack allowed intruders to take control. After gaining access to the sites, the attackers began delivering misinformation emails under the auspices of Lithuanian government and military ministries. Much of the misinformation being spread revolved around military enlistment and the suspicion of corruption at an airport housing a NATO facility.

Researchers discover millions of medical records online

Researchers at CybelAngel have uncovered over 45 million healthcare records on unprotected servers. Amongst the sensitive data was personal health information and other personally identifiable data, all left on servers with a login page that allowed access without credentials. It’s likely this data was left unsecured because of the number of medical professionals needing to access, though the security lapse is inexcusable. With healthcare facilities prime targets for ransomware attacks, communications between organizations should entail strict security to protect the valuable data.

Ransomware strikes city of Independence, Missouri

Officials for the city of Independence, Missouri, have been working for weeks to recover from a ransomware attack that forced them to take several essential services offline. Fortunately, recent file backups were available to restore some of the encrypted systems to normal. At this point, officials remain uncertain if customer or employee data was stolen during the attack, and no ransomware group has come forward to take credit for the attack or post the stolen data for sale.

Data Breach Compromises Patient Data at California Hospital

California’s Sonoma Valley Hospital recently delivered letters to roughly 67,000 patients regarding a data breach back in October that may have compromised personally identifiable information and other healthcare records. While the hospital was able to shut down some of their systems to prevent the breach from spreading, the attackers are believed to have gained access to and stole sensitive data.

Remote Work is Here to Stay, and Other Cybersecurity Predictions for 2021

The cybersecurity industry and end-of-year predictions go together like Fall and football or champagne and the New Year. But on the heels of an unprecedented year, where a viral outbreak changed the landscape of the global workforce practically overnight, portending what’s in store for the year ahead is even trickier than usual.  

One thing the cybersecurity experts at Webroot agree on is that work from home is here to stay for 2021, or at least it won’t recede to pre-pandemic levels in even the medium-term. What is likely to change is how companies respond to their remote workforces. The security measures they take (or don’t), the educational opportunities they provide (or fail to) and their commitment to innovation (or lack thereof) will likely separate the winners from the losers in the year ahead.

Yes, cybersecurity for remote workforces will likely be a prevailing concern throughout 2021, even following positive news on the vaccine development front, according to Webroot experts. Another prevailing theme from the professionals here, when asked to make their annual predictions for the new year, is that a cybersecurity skills gap will continue to haunt businesses and pose opportunities for those looking to start their careers in the field or make the switch to it. As such, automation and the adoption of AI technologies will be critical to plugging the gap.

Read on for more details from leading engineers, security analysts and product specialists from around our organization for complete cybersecurity predictions for 2021. Take heart because, whatever happens, 2020 won’t be easily outdone (knock on wood).

On remote workforces and the problem of personal devices

David Dufour, VP of engineering, Carbonite + Webroot

In 2021, many businesses will continue to operate remotely as a result of the pandemic and there must be an emphasis on training employees on security best practices, how to identify modern threats such as phishing, and where company data is being accessed and stored. Phishing is going to remain one of the most prominent ways to attack users and will become more sophisticated as it’s tailored to take advantage of work-from-home setups and distractions.  

Grayson Milbourne, security intelligence director, Carbonite + Webroot

The biggest change for 2021 will be securing remote workforces and remote perimeters, which include home networks and home devices, particularly personal devices. These all add their own challenges. Home networks and their configurations are diverse. Many use out-of-date routers with insecure settings. Personal devices are often used for work and, as we saw in our 2020 Threat Report, are twice as likely as business devices to encounter infections. If not addressed, this could have a serious impact on businesses in the coming year.

Hal Lonas, CTO and SVP of SMB engineering, Carbonite + Webroot

We shouldn’t overlook the incredible societal and behavioral changes underway right now. These put all of us in new situations we’ve never encountered before. These new contexts create new opportunities for social engineering attacks like phishing and scare tactics to get us to open emails and click on fraudulent links.

Tyler Moffitt, Sr. security analyst, Carbonite + Webroot

It really doesn’t matter the company or the length of the work-from-home stint, one thing that’s constant is that professionals at home are using their personal devices and personal network. Securing the remote perimeter is going to be the biggest challenge for cybersecurity professionals now through 2021 because laptops issued to professional workforce are much more secure than personal devices.

Personal devices are twice as likely to be infected than business devices. Even more worrying, we saw with our new COVID-19 report that one-third of Americans will use personal devices when working from home. Businesses will need to account for that.

Jamie Zajac, VP of product management, Carbonite + Webroot

I predict that in 2021 vulnerable industries like hospitality, travel and retail will start to use even more remote access platforms like Square and others. This transfers a lot of control to a third-party, so it’s essential companies make sure their data is protected on their end, that their vendors are trustworthy and that their reputation is safe from the damage an internal breach could cause

On the cybersecurity skills shortage

Briana Butler, engineering services manager, Carbonite + Webroot

Moving forward, cybersecurity professionals will need greater data analysis skills to be able to look at large sets of data and synthesize the information so organizations can derive actionable value from it. In 2021, organizations need to start implementing programs to upskill their current cybersecurity workforce to focus on the skills they’ll need for the future such as analyzing complex data, developing algorithms, and understanding machine learning techniques.

David Dufour, VP of engineering, Carbonite + Webroot

The cyber skills gap will continue to be an issue in 2021 because companies continue to believe they understand cybersecurity and, as a result, tend to spend less on external cybersecurity resources. This leads to a feeling of false security and, unfortunately, inadequate security.

Cybersecurity requires a financial investment to truly meet an organizations’ needs and to enact processes for securing systems. It’s much more effective to invest in a few, solid security processes and to address gaps at the outset than it is to implement an inexpensive, broad security solution that falls short in key areas.

Hal Lonas, CTO and SVP of SMB engineering, Carbonite + Webroot

The pandemic has also changed the game for managed service providers (MSPs). They’re used to running a thin-margin business, but this has become even more difficult as their small business customers struggle. MSPs are fortunately heavily automated, but now they are under increasing pressure to deliver more with less. MSPs more than ever need automated solutions that make it easy for them to manage, secure and restore customers when incidents do occur. Some of that automation will come from AI, but auto-remediation, backup and restore capabilities are also important.

Looking ahead to 2021

Whatever 2021 is, at least 2020 will be over, right? But in all seriousness, the virus does not respect our calendar transitions and its implications will certainly bleed over into the New Year. Much has been made of a supposed “new normal,” but to truly arrive there, companies must account for the new realities of pervasive remote work and an exacerbated cybersecurity skills shortage.

If there’s one takeaway from our experts’ predictions for 2021, it’s that.

Cyber News Rundown: Global Cybercrime Costs Surpass $1 Trillion

Cybercrime surpasses $1Trillion in global costs

A recent study has put the global cost of cybercrime at over $1 trillion for 2020. This figure is up significantly from 2018, which was calculated at around $600 billion. And while most effects are financial, roughly 92% of affected organizations cited by the study reported additional issues stemming from cyberattacks. Over half took no measures to prevent or recover from common types of attack.

Major hosting provider affected by cyberattack

The worldwide hosting service provider Netgain was forced to take many of its servers and data centers offline following a recent ransomware incident. The attack occurred just before Thanksgiving and continues to cause intermittent outages for customers as the company works to restore their systems. Due to the volume of systems Netgain provides services for, they remain unsure how long customers will be inconvenienced by the fallout from this attack.

Default passwords compromising radiology equipment

Researchers have discovered that GE has implemented default passwords that can be easily found online across a wide range of medical equipment. These passwords, used by technicians to perform routine maintenance, could also be used illicitly to take control of the machines or cause them to malfunction. Users are unable to change these credentials on their own and require a certified GE tech to come to make on-site adjustments. While GE has stated it does not believe any unauthorized access has been identified, the critical nature of these machines makes this a high priority vulnerability.

Educational technology still lacking proper security

An alarming number of schools and educational institutions switching to remote learning have made no changes to their security policies or implemented any cybersecurity training for staff and/or students. Additionally, nearly 40 percent of the schools surveyed weren’t even able to provide devices for their employees or students to work remotely during the pandemic, though 70 percent had switched their regular communications to video conferencing services.

Payment card skimmers hiding in CSS

Camouflaging payment card skimmers into the CSS of compromised e-commerce site is the latest evasion tactic being used by cybercriminals. The skimmer is run by the Magecart group, which is known for successfully evading detection software and innovating to boost longevity on compromised systems. The embedded script launches during the checkout process by redirecting the customer to a new page where it begins stealing information entered into a form.

Cyber News Rundown: Biological Worries Over Malware Attacks

Biological Worries Over Malware Attacks

Researchers have recently unveiled the latest potential victim for malware authors: biological laboratories. By illicitly accessing these facilities, hackers may be able to digitally replace sections of DNA strings, causing unexpected results when biologists go to create or experiment with these compounds. While it is fortunate that this specific targeted attack was simulated in a closed environment, it brought to light the extreme focus that a cyber-attack may be capable of implementing, and the lengths some attackers may go to accomplish their goal.

SMS App Exposes Messages of Millions

Despite the weeks of effort from the developer, GO SMS Pro an instant messaging app with over 100 million users is still suffering from messages being leaked. What originated as a bug has left the messaging app critically flawed for upwards of three months, with no clear signs of resolution, as even new versions of the app have been unable to rectify the problem. The researchers who discovered the flaw were able to view video and picture messages, along with other private messages, due to the URL shortening that occurs when the messages are sent to contacts that don’t have the app installed.

Colorado Health Service Provider Suffers Patient Data Breach

Sometime during the middle of September, the Colorado-based health service provider AspenPointe suffered a data breach that may have compromised the sensitive health information of nearly 300,000 patients. The facility noticed the unauthorized access over a two-week period, but only began notifying patients of the breach in the third week of November. Officials have also confirmed that everything from names to medical history, and other highly sensitive personal information was stolen, though no reports of misuse have yet arisen.

Ransomware Shuts Down Alabama School District

The Huntsville City school district, one of the largest in Alabama, has been forced to close all operations following a ransomware attack that took place as students and staff were returning from Thanksgiving break. District officials worked quickly to take all devices offline, be them computers or smart phones, to stop the spread of the attack. Students were also sent home early, with no firm statement on when classes would resume, as the attack could take them days or weeks to recover from.

Five Arrested in Louisiana Child Crime Sweep

At least 5 individuals have been arrested by the Louisiana Cyber Crime Unit, following an investigation into the online exploitation of children. By tracing IP addresses and even simply viewing social media profiles of all 5 individuals, law enforcement agents have been able to confirm charges of possession or creation of child pornography, thus removing another group of child predators from the general population.

Cyber News Rundown: REvil Ransomware Strikes

REvil Ransomware Strikes Hosting Provider

In recent days the web hosting provider Managed.com has been working to recover from a ransomware attack targeting many of their core systems. While the company was able to stop the spread of the attack by shutting down their systems and client websites, it remains unclear what information may have been encrypted and sent elsewhere. The demanded ransom is equal to $500,000 in Monero cryptocurrency and is set to double if not paid in the next week.

Cyberattack Shuts Down Americold Operations

Cold storage provider Americold revealed this week it was forced to shut down many of its systems after discovering evidence of a cyberattack. Some variant of ransomware is thought to be responsible for the attack, which has disabled several customer-facing services and could still be affecting Americold. Fortunately, the company responded quickly and was able to stop the attack from spreading across its network, which could have caused significantly more damage, especially if financial information was accessed.

Ticketmaster Receives Fine for 2018 Data Breach

More than two years after Ticketmaster announced a data breach had compromised a significant amount of customer information, the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) has settled on a fine of £1.25 million. The attack was significant because, while multiple organizations warned Ticketmaster of the breach, the company did nothing to resolve the security lapse. Officials also discovered that upwards of 60,000 customer payment cards were used for additional fraudulent activity after the Ticketmaster breach.

Healthcare Remains Easiest Target for Cyberattacks

A recent survey of healthcare organizations found that 73% had computer systems totally unprepared to repel a cyberattack. Attackers are improving their operations rapidly compared to security improvements being implemented by these organizations, even with the increasing year-over-year cybersecurity spending. To make matters worse, pressure put on the healthcare industry by the COVID-19 pandemic has forced many facilities to put security improvements on hold as they deal with increased patient numbers.

Severity of Capcom Breach Continues to Rise

A ransomware attack on Capcom that was initially suspected to not affect customer data has been found to be more severe than first thought. Upwards of 135,000 customers, employees and other individuals with ties to the company may have had sensitive personal information compromised. While Capcom has confirmed that payment data is processed through a third-party and isn’t stored on their systems, internal documents and statements seem to have been compromised by the attack.

Cyber News Rundown: Flood of Phony IRS Emails

Phony IRS Emails Flooding Inboxes

Upwards of 70,000 inboxes have been receiving spam claiming to be from the IRS threatening legal action for late or missing payments. Most recipients are Microsoft Office 365 users and have been receiving threats of lawsuits to, wage garnishment and even arrest. These spoofing scams have risen in popularity in recent years, but have mixed results since many users are familiar with the tactic.

Pakistani Airlines Network Access for Sale

Researchers found a listing for full admin access to the Pakistan International Airlines network on multiple dark web forums earlier this week. The current asking price is an incredibly low $4,000, considering the amount of information that could be used for malicious activities. The hackers claim to have 15 databases, each with many thousands of records, including passport data and other highly sensitive personal information on passengers and employees alike. It is believed that this group has been responsible for at least 38 other sales of network access in the past five months.

Zoom Enhances Security at Heed of FTC

Following a settlement with the FTC, the video communication service Zoom is being forced to upgrade its overall security after it was found that they weren’t implementing the end-to-end encryption the business touted. It was also discovered that encryption of recorded video calls often did not take place and regular security testing of security measures did not occur, endangering user privacy for personal video calls and chats.

Mashable Database Compromised

The online media outlet Mashable confirmed it had suffered a cyberattack on its systems, and that the attacker had already published some of the stolen data, this weekend. Fortunately, Mashable also confirmed the stolen data was from a system that was no longer in use. The company has also begun contacted affected customers and informing them to be wary of suspicious emails and to forward them to Mashable for further investigation.

Millions of RedDoorz Records for Sale

Roughly 5.8 million user records belonging to the hotel booking platform RedDoorz were found for sale on a hacker forum. These records were likely the the result of a cyberattack targeting RedDoorz in September, though the company firmly stated no financial information was compromised. After viewing a sample of the stolen data, however, it was discovered that a significant amount of extremely sensitive information belonging to customers who may have stayed at any of their 1,000 properties across Southeast Asia had been published.

Cyber News Rundown: Maze Ransomware Shuts Down

Maze Ransomware Group Ends Operations

A press release issued this week announced the end of the Maze ransomware group’s data theft operations. In the release, the Maze authors revealed their motives behind one of the most successful ransomware campaigns to date, and why they chose to finally shut down their massive project. It also stated the Maze team was working to expose the major security holes key industries fail to address, though their methods created many victims.  

Magecart Targets International Gold Retailer

Nearly three months after a data breach caused by a Magecart attack struck the international precious metals retailer, JM Bullion has finally released an official statement to customers. After identifying unauthorized activity on their systems in the mid-July, the company went on to find that their systems had been compromised since February by Magecart payment card-skimming software. The company has yet to acknowledge why took so long to discover the breach or why it failed to follow GDPR regulations by immediately contacting affected customers.

Ryuk Remains Top Player Throughout 2020

With ransomware continuing its stay at the top of the cyberthreat throne, Ryuk variants have been responsible for over a third of all ransomware attacks in 2020 alone or roughly 67 million attacks. Ryuk has been around for over two years, but found much greater success this year after being found responsible for only 5,100 attacks in 2019. Ransomware attacks grew 40 percent over last year, to nearly 200 million as of Q3.

Cannabis Site Leaves Database Exposed

An unsecured database belonging to cannabis website GrowDiaries and housing over 3.4 million user records was found to be accessible last month. The data included 1.4 million user passwords that were encrypted using MD5 hashing, which is known to be easily unlocked by cybercriminals. Nearly a week after being informed of the database GrowDiaries properly secured it from public access, though it remains unclear how long it was accessible or who accessed it during that time.

Mattel Reveals Ransomware Attack

Following a July ransomware attack, Mattel has finally issued an official statement regarding the overall damage. The company has confirmed that no data was stolen during the attack, which was quickly identified by their security, and many systems were taken offline to prevent any damage or theft occured. The ransomware attack was likely perpetrated by TrickBot, as it’s known for concentrating on large organizations and leaving them exposed for some encrypting variant to follow.

Cyber News Rundown: Flash Banned from Windows

Adobe Flash Being Uninstalled on Windows Systems

Following its September announcement, Microsoft has released an update that removes Adobe Flash from Windows 10 systems and prevents reinstallation. It should be noted that this update only removes the version of Adobe Flash that comes bundled with Windows 10. Internet browser extensions and stand-alone installs of the software will remain unaffected by this update. Should the user want to re-install Adobe Flash on an updated system, they must either revert to a point prior to the update or perform a fresh install of Windows 10.

Gunnebo Suffers Critical Data Breach

Officials for Gunnebo, a Swedish security firm, have revealed that they were victims of a data breach in August. Researchers also discovered an 18GB file confirmed to contain customer information stolen from Gunnebo. The compromised data was uploaded to a public server after Gunnebo refused to pay a ransom, exposing roughly 38,000 sensitive files.

Finnish Health Center Hacked

It was recently revealed that the Finnish psychotherapy center Vastaamo suffered a ransomware attack that compromised highly sensitive patient data belonging to thousands of individuals. After refusing to pay a 40 Bitcoin ransom, the attackers began publishing the stolen data on the dark web. While officials have yet to determine when the breach occurred, they have been contacting victims about the stolen data since October 21.

Customer Accounts at UK Restaurant Chain Breached

Recent technology changes at restaurants and other public establishments like touchless methods of interaction have left UK restaurants open major security flaws. One such flaw has been exploited at UK restaurant chain Nando’s, with several customer accounts affected. By accessing previous account logins and using credentials that were stolen in prior cyberattacks, hackers have been able to create fraudulent orders. The company has since confirmed that, though they themselves weren’t the target of the breach, they will compensate any customers who are fraudulently charged.

Ryuk Suspected in Major Steelcase Attack

International furniture maker Steelcase was forced to take its systems offline following a ransomware attack that began late last week. It is believed that the attack used the highly active ransomware variant, Ryuk, though this has yet to be confirmed by Steelcase. By shutting down the remaining unaffected systems, Steelcase hopes it was able to stop the spread of encryption before irreparable damage was caused.