SMBs

How Ransomware Sneaks In

Ransomware has officially made the mainstream. Dramatic headlines announce the latest attacks and news outlets highlight the staggeringly high ransoms businesses pay to retrieve their stolen data. And it’s no wonder why – ransomware attacks are on the rise and the...

An MSP and SMB guide to disaster preparation, recovery and remediation

Introduction It’s important for a business to be prepared with an exercised business continuity and disaster recovery (BC/DR) plan plan before its hit with ransomware so that it can resume operations as quickly as possible. Key steps and solutions should be followed...

Podcast: Cyber resilience in a remote work world

The global pandemic that began to send us packing from our offices in March of last year upended our established way of working overnight. We’re still feeling the effects. Many office workers have yet to return to the office in the volumes they worked in pre-pandemic....

5 Tips to get Better Efficacy out of Your IT Security Stack

If you’re an admin, service provider, security executive, or are otherwise affiliated with the world of IT solutions, then you know that one of the biggest challenges to overcome is efficacy. Especially in terms of cybersecurity, efficacy is something of an amorphous...

How Cryptocurrency and Cybercrime Trends Influence One Another

Typically, when cryptocurrency values change, one would expect to see changes in crypto-related cybercrime. In particular, trends in Bitcoin values tend to be the bellwether you can use to predict how other currencies’ values will shift, and there are usually...

It’s time to ask: Is ransomware insurance bad for cybersecurity?

The issue at the heart of ransomware insurance will be familiar to most parents of young children: rewarding bad behavior only invites more of the same, so it’s generally not a good idea. But critics of the ransomware insurance industry argue that’s exactly what the practice does.

Ransomware insurance has by now long been suspected of excusing lax security practices and inspiring confidence among cybercriminals that they’ll receive a timely payment following a successful breach.

Exactly how widespread ransomware claims by businesses are is difficult to determine since companies don’t exactly jump at the chance to discuss their run-ins with ransomware publicly. But it’s safe to assume that claims have risen alongside an undeniable surge in ransomware attacks.

Another issue with the cyber insurance industry stems from the fact that paying a ransom is no guarantee that data will be returned. In our recent report on the hidden costs of ransomware, nearly 20 percent of respondents were not able to recover their data even after making an extortion payment.

The Paris-based insurance giant AXA broke new ground this year by announcing it would stop insuring against cyberattacks, citing a lack of guidance from French regulators about the practice. It’s worth remembering that the FBI “does not support paying a ransom in response to a ransomware attack.”

So, if U.S.-based insurers were to follow AXA’s logic, they too would stop covering ransomware payments. So far, few have. For now.

Doomed to be a short-lived sector?

The industry publication InsuranceJournal.com recently wrote in a post on its site that “pressure is building on the industry to stop reimbursing for ransoms.” Before ransomware went rampant, the article notes, cybersecurity insurance was a profitable sub-category of the insurance business as a whole. But those days may be numbered. The sector is now “teetering on the edge of profitability” according to the post’s author.

It’s well-known within cybersecurity circles that ransomware actors will conduct advanced research to determine if a potential target is insured. If so, it’s hardly a deterrent since it increases the likelihood a payment will be made.

It winds up being a self-reinforcing cycle. As ProPublica wrote in its study of the industry, “by rewarding hackers, it encourages more ransomware attacks, which in turn frighten more businesses and government agencies into buying policies.”

A commonly cited defense of ransomware insurance is that they not only protect against the cost of the ransom, but also against knock-on expenses from ransomware like downtime, reallocation of tech resources and reputational damage. We know from our own research that these costs can be significant, so there’s some validity to this argument.

But the real question the cyber insurance industry needs to answer is whether it can ever again be profitable. A recently released paper from the British defense think tank Royal United Services Institute (RUSI), titled Cyber Insurance and the Cyber Security Challenge, identified this as one of the key challenges to the industry’s viability.

That paper found that “there is arguably too little global premium to absorb losses from a systemic event.” In other words, the next NotPetya could sink the industry.

Ransomware on the whole has caused losses in the cyber insurance industry, not least because, “unlike the majority of risks insurers cover, ransomware attacks are both a high-impact and a high-probability risk.”

Addressing cybersecurity insurance shortfalls

Importantly, the RUSI paper in the end reported that it was unable to find empirical evidence that “cyber insurers may be unintentionally facilitating the behavior of cybercriminals by contributing to the growth of targeted ransomware operations.” While that fact undermines arguments that cyber insurers are a boon for ransomware actors, it doesn’t speak to the question of viability.

As with any nascent industry, ransomware insurance vendors have some tough issues to grapple with concerning how they do business. The “race to the bottom,” which RUSI describes as a combination of cheap premiums and loose restrictions on underwriting (not requiring basic cybersecurity measures as part of the deal, for example), represents the real risk to the industry.

Its possible cyber insurance companies could drastically reduce claims by mandating a cyber resilience posture as a condition of being insured. Like a higher life insurance premium for a career stunt man, organizations without robust cybersecurity in place (including defense plus backup and restoration capabilities) could be forced to foot a higher bill. While this is already standard practice among many insurers, industry regulation may be required to prevent the opening of a market for insurers with more lax baseline cybersecurity requirements.

At the very least, insurers should insist on three core elements of cybersecurity strategy before underwriting:

  • Endpoint and network level security to guard against attacks. Devices secured with antiviruses and networks secured by DNS filters or firewalls should be the bare minimum requirement for protecting against ransomware attacks. Without them, ransomware actors are being invited in the front door.
  • Mandated ongoing security awareness training for employees. User-enabled breaches remain one of the most common causes of a successful ransomware attack. Without addressing end users’ tendency to fall for phishing and other social engineering attacks, while ransomware actors may find the front door locked, they know there’s a good chance it will be opened for them by someone on the inside.
  • Proven data backup and security protocols. Maintaining complete copies of mission-critical data is one of the simplest ways to undermine ransomware actors. By collectively removing this key piece of leverage, organizations can go a long way toward normalizing the non-payment of ransomware demands, easing the burden on cyber insurers.

Making the above the minimum standard for organizations would both minimize the damage caused by ransomware actors and increase the viability of ransomware insurance as an industry. By prioritizing cyber resilience over any one category of security, businesses can prevent breaches and get back to work easier when they do occur.

As workforces migrate from offices, workflows migrate to the cloud

In March of 2020 schools throughout the United Kingdom closed their doors to try to stem the spread of the coronavirus. In addition to disruptions to the lives of students and their families, the pandemic put unprecedented pressure on IT departments across the UK and wider world.

Notoriously strapped for resources, many schools’ IT departments found themselves without access to server rooms and no way to troubleshoot for students and staff when grading, learning and teleconferencing applications encountered problems.

In 2020 this situation was unfolding around the UK, and why CloudHappi began searching for a solution for their clients. CloudHappi is a London-based provider of IT solutions tailored for the education sector. Determined to provide the best learning experience possible for remote students, the company began exploring opportunities for shifting the IT burden from on-premise servers to the cloud.

Unfortunately, many of the earlier solutions CloudHappi explored took up to 15 days to perform a complete migration, an unacceptable timeline for schools looking to establish some sense of normalcy as soon as possible. After finding Carbonite and its server migration solution, however, it was able to perform a complete migration for its first school within a single day.  

As a result, IT operations for the school experienced fewer disruptions, applications were easy to access and unfortunate circumstances for students were made a little easier to handle.

Many reasons to migrate

Schools across the UK and United States are planning to open in the fall, notwithstanding uncertainty caused by the spread of the virus’s Delta variant. Vaccinations in much of the world are prompting workers to return to offices and life to start to resemble its pre-pandemic state in many ways.

But in other ways, it may never again. By some estimates, less than 35% of workers have returned to office spaces. Many companies don’t plan on requiring their workforces to come back at all. Some business leaders see remote work as a net positive, giving them access to larger talent pools, reducing pollution, freeing up time spent commuting for more productive tasks and cutting facilities costs.

Whether inspired by downsizing and office space or not renewing leases at all, there’s a good chance this shift in the workforce will require many more migrations from on-premise servers to the cloud. Not unlike in the case of UK schools, IT admins will require greater access to productivity solutions without the need for physical space in which to operate.

Aside from the flexibility of being able to access systems from anywhere, migrating to the cloud entails several knock-on benefits for businesses, whether MSPs or their clients.

  • Streamlined management – By offloading server management to a public cloud like Microsoft Azure or Amazon Web Services, businesses capitalize on all the economies of scale these companies have built over years of innovation and investment. Given the resources at their disposal, most cloud companies dwarf the capabilities of small IT teams
  • Enhanced security – With well-developed security policies covering things like firewalls, open ports and security teams dedicated to uncovering and patching vulnerabilities, public cloud companies often offer better security coverage than small IT teams. Even as bigger targets compared to a self-managed small business, available again give these companies the edge in terms of data security.
  • High-availability – Migrating data to the cloud also puts high-availability data replication possible for businesses. While large public cloud operations are highly reliable, outages do happen. When they do, high availability cloud architecture can quickly search to an unaffected server containing byte-by-byte replication if an original happens to go down. Without a high-availability solution, to use our example of schoolchildren in the UK, video conferencing software may become inoperable and students unable to learn together. For a business, losing access to certain applications because of a cloud outage can spell disaster. If email systems or customer account portals become inaccessible the costs can mount quickly.

In a sense, COVID-19 accelerated trends in computing trends by years. While much work had been moving to the cloud for some time before the pandemic hit, the sudden need for a distributed workforce heightened its importance overnight. Luckily, migrating offers significant benefits for all types of organizations and looks to be well suited for the workforce of the future.

To learn more about the benefits of migrating to the cloud, visit the Carbonite Migrate page here.

Redundancy for resilience: The importance of layered protection in the cloud

At Carbonite + Webroot, we’re always preaching about the importance of layering security solutions. Because here’s the truth: data’s always at risk. Whether from cybercriminals, everyday mishaps or mother nature, businesses can put up all the defenses they want but disaster only has to successfully strike once.

The global pandemic means more work is being conducted in the cloud, so this is no time to be lax with the security of cloud backups. Unless protection is redundant, organizations risk of losing mission-critical data – for minutes, days or permanently depending on the disaster – and putting their survival at risk.

That’s why layered protection in the cloud is so critical to cyber resilience. Without it, any one failure can be catastrophic.

So, how’s it done?

Let’s start with endpoints

For organizations managing hundreds or thousands of endpoints, backing each up to the cloud is important for keeping employees productive in the case of hardware failure, device theft, damage or malicious insiders. It’s easy to see how a laptop can be damaged, so it’s obvious for most that files stored locally should be backed up to the cloud.

But it’s also important to recognize that work done in the cloud should also be backed up. For example, one of the world’s most popular productivity tools for office workers, Microsoft 365, increasingly carries out its core functions in the cloud. But it has some serious gaps in terms of backup capabilities.

The average endpoint user may not know or care which important work files are stored, so long as they’re there when needed. This makes it important that Microsoft 365 data is backed up to the cloud – regardless of whether the user is aware if updates are being made locally or if the location is using its cloud capabilities.

Finally, but in the other direction, cloud-based cybersecurity offers another form of data security from the cloud. This method avoids the risk of endpoints relying on out-of-date file definitions of known-bad files, instead relying on near real-time threat telemetry from the cloud. This allows for the near real-time protection of all endpoints using the solution once a threat is identified.

But must also include servers

It’s less obvious to many of us that servers are at risk of becoming ground zero for data loss as well. Hardware sometimes fails, power cords can be tripped over, or worse…natural disasters can strike data centers, wiping out servers through fires, floods or other types of damage.

What good are endpoints without the servers that feed them information? Cloud computing technology offers a handful of flexible opportunities for backing up data housed on servers.

On-premise servers – used to store data locally based a business’s preference, regulatory needs or other reasons – can and should still be backed up to the cloud in case of a localized outage. Usually this entails concentrating data within a single point of storage (a “vault”) that’s then bulk uploaded. This duplicated data can then be accessed in the event a physical location loses power or a fiber optic cable is severed by construction work, for example.

Off-premise server banks also can and should be protected by cloud backups. Many of these servers may store their data in public clouds, which are normally but not always highly reliable. Public cloud outages do happen. When they do, it pays to have another cloud backup solution to failover to so the business can continue to run.

Whether or not this data is stored in the cloud permanently or migrated there when needed, redundancy is established when on and off-premise server banks are backed up to the cloud.

Rounding out the redundancy is a disaster recovery as a service (DRaaS) solution. This form of high-availability replication anticipates a worst-case scenario for server data loss. With DRaaS, byte-level replication of changes on an organization’s systems are sent to the cloud. In the event of a disaster, you

Note that DRaaS is not to be confused with being a replacement for backup. These are two different solutions that can work perfectly well alongside each other. Backup should apply to every server in an environment and offers long term retention with flexible restore options.  DRaaS typically would be layered on top of backup, for the most mission critical servers, resulting in options to either restore from backup, or failover directly and rapidly to another cloud depending on the event that has rendered the production server or data inaccessible.

Maintain uptime, all the time

Threats to business data are all around us. Rates of ransomware are rising and remote workforces have ballooned since the outbreak of COVID-19. This is no time to trust in a single cloud as an organizational backup strategy. No single point of failure should keep users from accessing business-critical data. Luckily, there are many options for designed layered backup across clouds.  

What’s the difference between high availability and backup again?

It’s not just that they’re making headlines more often. Ransomware rates really are rising. Given the recent spate of high-profile attacks, it’s worth remembering the difference between standard backup and high-availability replication.

Our research suggests that the costs of ransomware for businesses can amount to much more than an extortion payment. They include lost hours of productivity, reputational damage, compliance fines and more. But maintaining access to critical data at all times can undermine ransomware actors’ leverage over an organization, reduce recovery time and earn the good graces of regulators and the public.

Ultimately, doing so comes down to answering the question: what data does my business simply need to back up, and what data can my business simply not do without? Knowing the difference helps to determine the Recovery Time Objective (RTO) for a given type of data or application.

A 24-hour recovery time may fall within the RTO for non-essential data and applications. For mission-critical data, on the other hand, a 24-hour recovery period may exceed the acceptable amount of time to be without access to data. It could drive up the cost of data breach significantly, perhaps even higher than a ransomware payment.

Also, it may come down to the amount of change-rate data that can be acceptability lost. Knowing the acceptable Recovery Point Objectives (RPO) can be as important as knowing the required RTOs.  For instance, a highly transactional system performing critical Online Transaction Processing (OLTP) could not afford the loss of data that occurred between backup cycles. 

Well-designed data backup plans tend to be a blend of both standard backup and high availability, so it helps to know the difference when determining which is the better fit for a given system, application or set of data.

Data backup

There are all sorts of good reasons to keep regular, reliable backups of business systems. These may concern the normal conveniences of document retention – not having to begin a project from scratch in the case of accidental deletion, for instance – or to satisfy industry or legal compliance regulations.

These backups are taken at pre-determined time intervals, typically once a day during non-working hours, and stored on a backup server. Often backups will be given an associated value called a retention.  A retention allows organization to keep certain backups for a longer period of time.  For instance, a business may decide it’s necessary to keep daily backups for a total of 30 days. But due to storage concerns, they will drop off the server on day 31. However, regulations or corporate policies may require keeping certain backups longer, so often they will designate a monthly of a yearly backup that has an extended retention for one or even up to seven years. 

Recently, backup servers have been targeted by ransomware actors.  Criminals will study an organization’s environment and specifically backup services. Therefore, it’s extremely important to have a backup for the backup. One of the preferred methods is a secondary cloud copy of the backup server.  Since the cloud copy sits on a separate network, it provides a layer of security making it more difficult to span the separate cloud network and target the secondary backup copy.

In most cases, backups like those discussed above have recovery times of hours for a localized power outage or even days for a flooded server room, for example. For an HR system, this RTO may be acceptable. For a point-of-sale system, this could mean significant lost revenue.

High availability

When a backup’s RTO and RPO time values do not meet the needs for recovering a company’s critical systems (OLTP servers, for instance), high-availability replication is an effective alternative for ensuring required operational performance levels are met. High-availability replication accomplishes this by keeping an exact copy of critical servers, maintained by real-time, byte-level replication, which remain powered off until needed. 

When that time comes, a failover procedure is initiated, and the copy assumes the role of the production system. The failover process typically occurs within a matter of a second or minutes, depending upon the server configuration or network latency. In cases of hardware failure or data center disasters, high-availability replication can stave off a data loss disaster.

However, since replication is real-time, an offline copy can be corrupted if the primary is attacked by ransomware. Therefore, system snapshots may be required to maintain clean point in time copies of the system. Snapshots are typically non-intrusive, do not noticeably delay replication and provide a failover with a better RPO than backup.

Like with backup, an off-site cloud solution can step in if on-site servers are out of commission. Latency can slightly lengthen recovery a small amount as the off-site cloud boots up, but the time to recovery still feels like a blip to users or customers.

For some organizations there may be no data critical enough to warrant implementing this high-availability architecture. For others, all data may be considered essential. For most, the reality will be fall somewhere in the middle. If companies are highly regulated or mandated by specific corporate retention requirements, a combination of high-availability replication and backup will likely exist for the same server.

Ensuring resilience against ransomware

In a blended backup/high-availability strategy, what matters most is deciding which systems are backed up by which before the worst happens. Whether handling backup for your own organization or for clients’, it’s important to have a well-tested backup plan in place that takes in RTOs based on acceptable amounts of downtime for data and applications.

4 ways ransomware can cost your business (in addition to extortion)

Cybersecurity analysts are charting both a rise in ransomware incidents and in amounts cybercriminals are demanding from businesses to restore their data. That’s bad news in itself, but what’s often overlooked are the additional ways – beyond payments victims may or may not choose to make– victims pay for these attacks.

Our latest threat report found the average ransomware payment peaked in September 2020 at more than $230 thousand. But the ransom alone doesn’t tell the whole story. To do that, we conducted another study to tally and quantify the collateral damage from surging ransomware incidents and rising extortion amounts.

These are some of those affects inflating the price tag of an attack, which we call The Hidden Costs of Ransomware.

1. Lost productivity

Our survey data found that hours of lost productivity from a ransomware incident were closely related to the length of time to discovery of the attack. Generally, faster detection meant limiting the spread of the infection and less time spent on remediation. In other words, the further ransomware spreads the longer it takes to eradicate. Unfortunately, almost half (49%) of respondents to our survey reported being unaware of the infection for more than 24 hours.

A third of incidents were reportedly remediated in 1-3 hours, while 17 percent required 3-5 days of effort. We attempted to quantify these lost hours based on hours spent on remediation (easily measurable) and the opportunity costs from diverting resources from IT teams’ “blue sky” responsibilities (tougher to measure).

Factoring in varying costs of IT resources, we determined low/high cost estimates for hours of remediation reported by survey respondents. These ran from $300/$750 for three hours or remediation to $4,000/$10,000 for five workdays of remediation. (A full breakdown is available in the report.)

2. Downtime costs

Regardless of whether an organization decides to pay a ransom, how long does it take to return to normal operations?

In our study, businesses that didn’t pay ransoms had recovered their data quicker than those that didn’t pay. Specifically, 70 percent of companies that didn’t pay a ransom were able to recover their data within a business day, compared to 46 percent that did.

Presumably this has to do with whether a target had readily available backups, and lost time due to back and forth with extortionists or time spent making a payment.

One of the most important factors in determining downtime costs is specifying the value of the data that’s become unavailable. Is it critical to conducting business operations? Or is it nice to have but not essential like marketing or prospecting data?

Determining data’s value helps businesses formulate their recovery time objectives (RTOs). For non-critical data and applications, a 24-hour recovery time may fall within the RTO. For mission-critical data, a 24-hour recovery may exceed the tolerable limit and help drive the cost of downtime higher than the ransom itself.

3. Impact on client operations

Nearly half (46%) of the businesses in our survey reported client operations being adversely affected by a ransomware incident at their own company. This could quickly sever business relationships that take a long time to build and result in the loss of anticipated revenue. But that’s not even be the riskiest aspect of client operations being affected.

The implications of supply chain attacks, especially for MSPs, came into sharper focus last year following the SolarWinds attack. Were a cybercriminal to compromise a trusted supplier to distribute ransomware, rather than for surveillance as in that attack, the costs could be enormous.

MSPs should seriously consider the possibility of becoming the source for such a supply chain attack, especially those with clients in critical industries like energy, public utilities, defense and healthcare.   

4. Brand and reputational damage

Consider the headlines and airtime generated by ransomware attacks against high-profile targets. A Google search of “Garmin ransomware,” for instance, returns more than 1 million results. While your organization may not be a global tech giant, it also likely doesn’t have the staying power of one.

In our study, 38 percent of businesses admitted their brand was harmed by a run-in with ransomware. Beyond lost customers, publicity issues could force businesses to enlist the services of expensive PR or communications firms to repair the damage.

Businesses with the resources to do so should consider themselves lucky, because the alternative is worse. Silence or an uncoordinated response to a ransomware attack – especially one that affects customers – can come of as unserious, callous or ineffective.

Reputational damage in an age of heightened sensitivity to cybersecurity incidents can have significant consequences. Our data shows that 61 percent of consumers switched some or all their business to a competing brand in the last year, and 77 percent admit they retract their loyalty now quicker than they once did.

The list goes on…

By no means is this an exhaustive list of the hidden costs of ransomware. They extend to fines for breaches of compliance regulation, the rising costs of cybersecurity insurance and a host of other unforeseen consequences.

For the complete findings from our survey and our recommendations for not encountering these hidden costs, download the full report.

Download the eBook

Podcast: How to build a cyber resilient business

Cyber resilience refers to a business’s ability to mitigate damage to its systems, processes and even its reputation. It’s based on the principle that, in the real (and really connected) world, adverse events occur. This could be in the form of a user enabling a breach by providing sensitive information during a phishing attack, through a new threat known as a “zero day” being weaponized against a business, or an event of any complexity in between.

When it comes to building a cyber resilient business, technology is an important piece. But it’s not the only one. A well-rounded security strategy is also essential. People and processes are key ingredients when it comes to that.

Audit checklists are a great place to start when ensuring your business is taking a holistic approach to data security, and so is this revealing conversation with Channel E2E and MSP Alert editor Joe Panettieri and a product marketing expert at OpenText.

The two discuss how there’s no silver bullet to all the potential threats to your data security, but how adapting the right mindset can help organizations begin to think about security differently. Our experts cover the “train, block, protect, backup and recover” model and what solutions for each can look like as a part of a real-life security stack.

The two touch on the importance of user security training, variables introduced by widespread remote workforces and how backup can undermine ransomware actors. Whether you’re designing a cybersecurity framework for your own business or putting one in place for clients, you won’t want to miss this conversation.

Building a Successful Customer Advocacy Program (Hint: It’s Not How You Think)

What’s better for getting your business’ name out there and boosting sales than having a killer business marketing plan with well-placed ads, zippy copy, and a slick design?

The answer is: having a group of dedicated real-world customers who use their own platforms to advocate for your business and its offerings.

Thanks to social media, reviewing platforms, and the steady rise of online presence, your customers have numerous avenues in today’s internet to help make (or break) your brand. Discerning prospective customers don’t trust faceless brands with no reviews. In increasingly saturated markets, one of the best ways to build your brand is not to advertise to your customers, but to turn them into advocates for your brand and services.

What’s the difference between advocacy and community?

Although they may go hand in hand, an advocacy program isn’t the same as a user community. User communities are more about connecting all of your end customers with one another, your teams, and the resources they need to be successful with your products; and about giving them an active forum to find support, both from their peers and your teams. But an advocacy program should be more selective about its members. Sure, at first, you may be happy just to get people involved so you can get your program off the ground; but the ideal customer for your advocacy program isn’t just an average user with little investment in the product. Instead, it’s someone whom you can recognize as a power user; someone who is invested in the success of your product as being integral to their own success, and will, therefore, be more likely to help evangelize your wins and also bring enhancement requests, unanticipated requirements, bugs, and other worthwhile concerns to your attention.

But how do you find these people? How do you keep them engaged once you do find them? And what does it look like to build an advocacy program that actually works for you and that your customers genuinely want to be a part of? We checked in with Emma Furtado, customer advocacy manager at Carbonite + Webroot, OpenText companies, for her take on the best tips to turn your savviest customers into your loyal advocacy partners who can’t wait to spread the word about your amazing products and efforts.

Top 4 Tips for Building a Successful Customer Advocacy Program

Tip #1: Take your time.

According to Emma, step one is recognizing that doing anything right takes time. “You can’t build a successful advocacy program overnight,” she clarifies, “you’ll need to have at least one employee, maybe even a team, depending on the size of your business and program goals, dedicated to research and relationship-building. You should also think about coordinating across teams. Very few customers want to be cold-called to take part in an advocacy program. Take advantage of the relationships your sales reps and engineers have already built; start working with them to identify power users and have them make an introduction so that you don’t have to start building the relationship entirely from scratch.”

Tip #2: Figure out your goals.

Sometimes in business, we end up with the desire to do something without fully understanding why it’s necessary or what it can do for us. “The point of an advocacy program isn’t to just being able to say you have one,” Emma explains. “It needs to be doing something for you and for your advocates. So, start with the basics around your own needs. Are you trying to build brand awareness, get stronger product feedback, or something else? Ask yourself how this program could boost efforts that your team is already working towards. After you fully outline why you’re doing it, you can start determining realistic goals, deliverables, and KPIs to measure the progress of your program. And once you have those pieces in place, you can start working to determine how best to engage with your customers to develop the kind of program that can achieve those goals.”

Tip #3: Hand-pick your members

As mentioned previously, when your program is in its infancy, you might choose to have a sort of volunteer enrollment phase just to get people in the proverbial door. But Emma warns that, to actually meet your objectives, you need to make sure you’re bringing in customers who will work with you and make good brand advocates. “Not every customer meets that criteria, and that’s okay. Each customer will want to engage with us differently. Your job here is to identify the people who would make good advocates and be willing to be active for your brand in one way or another. A good place to start is by looking for folks who are already engaged in customer-facing programs, such as product betas; who have already provided a Net Promoter Score (NPS); who recently responded to a survey; and/or people who are already active in your industry through blogs or social media.”

Tip #4: Give customers incentives, not bribes.

It sounds rational to entice advocates to your program with exclusive swag or even free software. That’s not the worst thing you could do; but quality brand advocates are the ones who do it to get the word out, help their fellow IT pro, and improve the products we all use, regardless of whether they have a sweet, company-branded vacuum-insulated stainless steel tumbler for their morning coffee. “A good advocacy program isn’t about getting any old kind of engagement with your wider audience,” Emma says, “it’s about creating a mutually beneficial situation between your business and a select group of highly-invested power users. Those users aren’t doing it for the swag. They’re doing it because they believe in your mission; or because they love your products and want to help guild your roadmap; or because they feel they represent unique concerns and feel an obligation to share that voice; or because they want chances to increase their own expertise or presence in the space. There are so many reasons that have nothing to do with free stuff.”

Summary

While customer advocacy can’t entirely replace your normal marketing spend line items, creating an advocate program can make all the traditional line items significantly more effective. It is an exciting and important opportunity to level up your marketing efforts by identifying and leaning on your brand evangelists, who effectively share the marketing burden with you.

“Figure out where your advocates are and go there. Talk to them about their businesses and goals. Show them you’re invested in their success, with or without your products. You’ll have an advocate for life.”

– Emma Furtado, customer advocacy manager, Carbonite + Webroot, OpenText companies

Keep in mind: an advocate program cannot succeed as a siloed effort. Customer advocacy works best when it supports your marketing efforts and product development. You can use the real-world customer input to inform your understanding of how customers want to be interacted with, improving the success of marketing programs and return on spend. Additionally, you can use the same feedback forum to guide how you use marketing and product development resources and pivot quickly on a leaner budget. By tailoring the overall customer journey to best serve their unique preferences and needs at each stage, you demonstrate to your base how highly you value their input. Ultimately, these actions serve to build a better experience for the customer overall, i.e., better reputation, brand recognition, and market posture for you.

We Finally Got Businesses to Talk About Their Run-ins With Ransomware. Here’s What They Said.

“It is a nightmare. Do all you can to prevent ransomware.”
 
– A survey respondent

Many businesses are hesitant to talk about their experiences with ransomware. It can be uncomfortable to cop being hit. Whether it’s shame at not doing more to prevent it, the risk of additional bad publicity from discussing it or some other reason, companies tend to be tight-lipped about these types of breaches.

By offering anonymity in exchange for invaluable quantitative and qualitative data, Webroot and professional researchers surveyed hundreds of business leaders and IT professionals about their experiences with ransomware attacks.

Perhaps the most surprising finding from our survey, and certainly one that presents broader implications for those involved, is that the ransom demanded by attackers is only a small part of the loss that accompanies these crimes. There are also lost hours of productivity, reputational suffering, neutralized customer loyalty, data that remains unrecoverable with or without paying a ransom and the general sense of unfairness that comes with being the victim of a crime.

Our ransomware report seeks to quantify these knock-on effects of ransomware to the extent possible. We looked at the value of a brand and how likely customers are to remain loyal to one after their data is compromised in a breach. We studied the relationship between the time to detection of the incident and its cost. We added up the labor cost spent during remediation.

But we were also interested in real people’s stories concerning their run-ins with ransomware. What advice would they give to those who may find themselves in their same position? Respondents talked about the inevitability of attack, the relief when frequent backups mitigate the worst effects of ransomware, the importance of a plan, and advised against the payment of ransoms.

Finally, we provide advice for defending against or at least reducing the disruptive impact of ransomware attacks. As a security company, it won’t be surprising that we recommend things like endpoint and network security. But it goes deeper than that. We stress the importance of empowering users with the knowledge of what they’re up against and implementing multiple layers of defense.

Most importantly – no matter how comprehensive or scattershot a business’s protection is – is that that it’s are in place before it’s needed. During the fight is not the time to be building battlements. If your organization has avoided the scourge of ransomware so far, that’s excellent. But IT administrators and other decision-makers shouldn’t count on their luck holding out forever.

Here are a few of the report’s most enticing findings, but be sure the download the full eBook to access all of the insights it delivers.

KEY FINDINGS

  • 50% of ransomware demands were more than $50k
  • 40% of ransomware attacks consumed 8 or more man-hours of work
  • 46% of businesses said their clients were also impacted by the attack
  • 38% of businesses said the attack harmed their brand or reputation
  • 45% were ransomware victims in both their business and personal lives
  • 50% of victims were deceived by a malicious website email link or attachment
  • 45% of victims were unaware of the infection for more than 24 hours
  • 17% of victims were unable to recover their data, even after paying the ransom

Why SMBs are Under Attack by Ransomware

Ransomware attacks generate big headlines when the targets are government entities, universities and healthcare organizations. But there’s one increasingly frequent target of ransomware attacks that tends to slip under the radar. Small and midsize businesses (SMBs) have become bigger financial targets for hackers. As Webroot Senior Threat Researcher Kelvin Murray points out in a recent Hacker Files podcast, the SMB sector has become a cash cow for cybercriminals. According to Murray, there are more SMB targets than criminals have time to target, mostly due to inadequate security among SMBs.

Listen to the full episode of the Hacker Files podcast hosted by Joe Panettieri here.

It’s also become far easier for anyone with malign intentions but lacking coding skills to launch attacks. Murray cites the availability of ransomware kits on the dark web that anyone can download and figure out how to launch. Going by the name Ransomware as a Service, these kits reduce the sophistication required for perpetrators to target SMBs and collect hefty ransom payments.

Business email compromise (BEC) is also on the rise. In BEC attacks the perpetrator, pretending to be a colleague or vendor, contacts you under the pretense of requesting payment or disbursement for a seemingly legitimate business purpose. Businesses easily fall for these scams because, with so many invoices and payments occurring on a daily basis, it’s easy to slip a fake one in.

All of this malicious activity points to the need for a layered approach to cybersecurity. This includes essential security measures like firewalls, endpoint protection and DNS protection. And, since even firewalls can be circumvented, it means keeping backups of all business data so you never have to pay a ransom to get your data back.

Attacks like BEC are less about malware and more about manipulating people. This is why security awareness training with phishing simulations are increasingly important. Murray emphasizes that security awareness training is necessary due to the increasing popularity of remote working. While the corporate office is usually equipped with firewalls, DNS protection, corporate logins and security guards at the front door, now that everybody’s working from home, all of those things are absent. In their place you have faulty routers, dodgy setups, people sharing houses with other people and maybe even sharing PCs.

You can listen to the full Hacker Files podcast hosted by Joe Panettieri here.

3 Ransomware Myths Businesses Need to Stop Believing ASAP

Despite the rising ransomware numbers and the numerous related headlines, many small and medium-sized businesses (SMBs) still don’t consider themselves at risk from cyberattacks. Nothing could be further from the truth. Smaller organizations are a prime target, and ransomware authors have only upped the ante in their methods to ensure they get paid. For example, many ransomware groups now threaten to expose or sell company data stolen in a breach if victims refuse to pay, meaning the business in question could have to shell out for heavy fines due to GDPR and similar regulations. In many cases, paying the ransom may be the most cost effective (and least publicly embarrassing) option. But what if your business can’t afford it? Or if the downtime from the attack is too much to recover from? And what’s the long-term psychological and emotional toll?

Here are 3 myths about ransomware that businesses need to stop believing to stay resilient against these evolving and insidious attacks.

Myth #1: My company is small, so attackers won’t bother.

Today, any business is a target for ransomware, no matter its size. Since 2018, up to 86% of SMBs have reported being victims of ransomware each year. And, according to Verizon, “[Ransomware] is a big problem that is getting bigger, and the data indicates a lack of protection from this type of malware in organizations.”

We’ve put this myth at the top of our list because it’s particularly dangerous. For many small organizations, a single cyberattack could put them out of business. Bigger enterprises with more robust data recovery and bigger security budgets are much more likely to weather an attack, while a smaller business may have no way of making up for the loss of time, revenue, and damage to customer trust that an attack could have.

Ransomware is not going away, and it’s getting more costly for SMBs. Businesses can’t afford to underestimate the risk.

Myth #2: There’s no way to prepare for a ransomware attack.

The sad truth in today’s cyber climate is that an attack is practically inevitable. The trick is reducing the likelihood of an attack, and making sure critical data is protected in case an attack succeeds. To prepare your business to weather the storm, there are a few key steps you can take.

  1. Proactively defend against ransomware attacks.
    Ransomware typically gets into an organization by tricking a user into downloading a file and/or enabling macros. Combining reliable endpoint protection that can stop macros and malicious scripts with security awareness training for end users is an excellent step toward a proactive and in-depth defense.
  2. Protect your data.
    The ransomware business model works because losing access to your data can cause serious damage. A strong backup solution is vital. Full-server backups or asking end users to manage their own backups aren’t the most feasible options. But with the right solution set, there are significantly more efficient ways to ensure data on endpoint devices, servers, and within the Microsoft 365 suite is secured.

Myth #3: I already have a backup, so I’m safe.

If your business gets hit with an attack, you can and should expect some downtime. And if we accept the maxim “time is money,” then any amount of downtime is costly and potentially damaging. Having backups in place is crucial, but you also need to be able to recover the data you need quickly from safe backups that haven’t also been infected with the ransomware.

Bigger organizations have more resources to invest in redundant servers in secondary locations, but these protections can come at too high a cost for many SMBs. If that sounds like you, you’re not alone. We recommend you look into disaster recovery as a service (DRaaS), so you can leverage the cloud to ensure that critical business systems are online and accessible, no matter what happens on your network.

Next Steps

The one-two combination of proactive prevention and recovery is key for staying cyber resilient. If you start working to address the tips in this blog, you’ll drastically improve your chances of avoiding a ransomware attack entirely; and getting through it successfully if you do get breached.

For more details on these and other misconceptions to watch out for, get your free copy of our guide, Rip the Target Off Your Back: Debunking the Top 5 Myths about Ransomware and SMBs.

Who’s Hacking You?

One of the reasons why there’s so much cybercrime is because there are so many ways for cybercriminals to exploit vulnerabilities and circumvent even the best defenses. You may be surprised to find that one of the biggest vulnerabilities is users. Many successful attacks could actually be prevented if users just knew what to look for. In that spirit, we put together this blog post to explain the different hacker types and methods they use against us.

For even more tips from Webroot IT security experts Tyler Moffitt, Kelvin Murray, Grayson Milbourne, George Anderson and Jonathan Barnett, download the complete e-book on hacker personas.

Take a deep dive into the three main hacker types and get tips on how to defend against them by downloading the e-book, Hacker Personas: a deeper Look Into Cybercrime.

The Impersonator

Today’s cybercriminals are masters at exploiting basic human trust. Pretending to be someone else, these hackers manipulate their victims into opening doors to systems or unwittingly sharing passwords or banking details. This type of cybercriminal is skilled at masking their true intentions behind seemingly harmless requests or legitimate-looking websites. Impersonators are increasingly sophisticated, often hosting malicious content on legitimate sites.

The Opportunist

Opportunists exploit common human traits such as trust and familiarity. They rely on targeted or focused attacks, and carry out their crimes against specific businesses or individuals. These hackers thoroughly research their targets, often running tests before launching the actual attack. Opportunists look for existing weaknesses or vulnerabilities they can exploit at scale to pull as many victims as possible into their nets.

The Infiltrator

Infiltrators rely on virtual back doors and unprotected points-of-entry to slip through hidden

cracks. Hiding in the shadows, this type of cybercriminal watches and waits for the opportunity to invade systems. DNS (Domain Name System) is especially vulnerable. Once the criminal redirects internet traffic to malicious websites or takes control of servers, the damage is inevitable.

One of the most common methods of infiltration includes internet-based attacks, such as Denial of Service (DoS), Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) and DNS poisoning. By default, DNS traffic is unencrypted, allowing internet service providers and other third parties to monitor website requests, surveil browsing habits, and even duplicate web servers to redirect traffic. However, cybercriminals can also use legal DNS traffic surveillance to their advantage.

Cybersecurity Tips for Individuals and Businesses

Aside from arming yourself with the knowledge you need to identify attacks, it’s important to install threat detection and remediation software on your devices. Be sure to update and patch software and firewalls as well as network security programs. You should also be skeptical of any requests for financial information or passwords, and scrutinize all COVID-related emails, links or apps. To learn more tips on how to identify and prevent attacks, download the complete e-book below.

Reducing the Time to Discovery: How to Determine if You Have Been Hacked

For most small businesses, the chances of falling prey to a long-term covert surveillance operation by well-resourced, likely state-backed actors are slim. To recap, that is what the evidence suggests happened in the SolarWinds compromise discovered last December. Many believe the company’s Orion update was used to conduct cyber espionage for months prior to being discovered.

However, data shows the time to detect a data breach for businesses averages 280 days, according to research conducted by IBM and the Ponemon Institute; a significant gap between the time a network is compromised and its discovery. This shows that stealthily surveilling a network is not a tactic exclusive to highly sophisticated threat actors targeting enterprise businesses.

What would reducing the time to discovery mean for small businesses? Likely it would mean less of their data on the dark web, fewer important pieces of intellectual property leaked, ransomware attacks thwarted or less reputational damage to companies.

Here are some ideas IT admins can use to detect a network compromise sooner, potentially limiting the damage of an adverse cyber event.

Consider booby trapping your network

As swashbuckling as it sounds, adopting an “offensive defensive” posture against cyberattacks can help your organization level the playing field against attackers. Because so much of cybersecurity relies on passive forms of protection (think firewalls, antivirus solutions, password protection, etc.), hackers have an asymmetrical advantage when probing defenses. Passive protection is good and necessary, to be sure, but network “booby traps,” sometimes called canary tokens, can help reduce the advantage held by hackers.

These measures may include setting up a domain administrator account that is bound to look like a juicy target to a network intruder. It may be configured according to default settings or with a particularly weak password – some way that makes it easy for a determined hacker to access. Once inside, though, the intruder’s presence triggers alarms alerting IT staff that an attack is underway and even locking out the suspicious user.

Researchers have laid out several ways booby trapping could work, but all rely on the principal of an action being taken by an attacker that would typically not occur otherwise. While they may not reveal who is behind the attack or their motivations, booby traps trigger a response alerting admins and allowing time to react.

Configure and pay close attention to failed login attempts

Allowing attackers unlimited tries at cracking passwords is never wise, but sometimes the configurations for preventing this are overlooked. This is especially dangerous when remote desktop protocol (RDP) is enabled. RDP-enabled machines can often be located using search engines like Shodan.io, making them sitting ducks for attackers armed with brute-force tools.

When configured properly, however, RDP and other password protected tools should lock users out after a given number of incorrect attempts and alert an admin. This would force a user, legitimate or otherwise, to wait some predetermined time before attempting to login again. Reaching out to the locked-out user could then help determine if the credentials have been stolen or if it is a genuine case of “fat fingers.”

If credentials have been compromised, it is a good idea to force password resets and keep an eye out for further failed login attempts. If there is no limit to the number of times a password can be tried without being timed out, an organization may never know it is in an attacker’s crosshairs.

Monitor anomalous web traffic

Skilled threat actors like those involved in the SolarWinds attack take steps to conceal their true locations when attempting to compromise a network. This can prevent alarm bells from ringing when, suddenly, an IP address from Eastern Europe is trying to connect to a network housed in Silicon Valley. Other times, malicious hackers do not have the skills or resources to cover their tracks. Their attack may also be so broadly aimed they simply do not care to.

That is why the difference between looking for malware and looking for “weird stuff” matters. It takes time to gather the data to truly know what constitutes “anomalous activity,” but once it is there it can automatically alert admins when it occurs. This could include communication with previously unknown IP addresses or uncommon application traffic patterns. In other words, a platform that has never talked to a domain in China but now does so often should be cause for alarm.

Monitoring access lists, including who is logged into what and whether anything is out of the ordinary, is another good option for spotting potential breaches early on. These so-called “spot-checks” can be too resource intensive for small businesses without dedicated IT positions, and too expensive to farm out to MSPs, but they are good to consider for businesses with dedicated IT resources.

Staying on guard against attacks

The best strategies for ensuring cyberattacks are not successful – and do not go unnoticed if they do – involve a mix of active and passive defenses. But poor configurations can undermine both. While small businesses are unlikely to become targets of highly skilled state-sponsored attackers, there are steps they can still take to make sure defenses are not undermined by the same common tactics.  

Here are a few quick tips:

  • Do not rely on the default configuration for RDP. Enforce 2FA and passwords time outs.
  • Disable powerful tools like PowerShell, Office macros and WMI where not needed.
  • Limit access rights on your internal network so that only those who need access have it.
  • Strictly control access to the dev and QA processes if these take place within your organization.