Webroot Threat Team Member - Tyler Moffitt

Tyler Moffitt

Threat Blog Posts: 18

Tyler started at Webroot in 2010 as a Front Line Engineer. He has since moved up in positions to Senior Threat Research Analyst. Tyler focuses improving the consumer experience of cleaning an infection by creating database rules, writing blogs, and testing in-house tools. Tyler has a passion for hands on learning and likes to spend his time gathering samples from the wild to test and improve Webroot’s ability to deal with the latest threats.



Posts by Tyler Moffitt:

Social Engineering improvements keep Rogues/FakeAV a viable scam

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The threat landscape has been accustomed to rogues for a while now. They’ve been rampant for the past few years and there likely isn’t any end in sight to this scam. These aren’t complex pieces of malware by any means and typically don’t fool the average experienced user, but that’s because they’re aimed at the inexperienced user. We’re going to take a look at some of the improvements seen recently in the latest round of FakeAVs that lead to their success. While the images shown may have different names of A-Secure, Zorton, and AVbytes, they are identical in execution, appearance and are likely from the same author(s). Webroot […]

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Vaporizer chargers can contain malware

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Vaporizers (AKA E-cigarettes) have been gaining some serious traction and widespread use over the past few years. The sudden surge of popularity isn’t too surprising considering the fact that the health implications of nicotine consumption are vastly more favorable with vaporizers when compared to traditional cigarettes. Most Vaporizers charge through a propriety connection to USB that looks something like this: In a recent reddit post, the poster reported that an executive at a large corporation had a data security breach on his system from malware, the source of which could not be determined initially. The machine was patched up to date, […]

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CoinVault

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  Today we encountered a new type of encrypting ransomware that looks to be of the cryptographic locker family. It employs the same method of encryption and has a very similar GUI (kills VSS, increases required payment every 24hr, uses bitcoin payment, ect.). Here is the background that it creates – also very similar. What’s unique about this variant that I wanted to share with you all is that this is the first Encrypting Ransomware that I’ve seen which actually gives you a free decrypt. It will let you pick any single file that you need after encryption and will decrypt […]

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We analyze Cryptobot, aka Paycrypt

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Recently during some research on encrypting ransomware we came across a new variant that brings some new features to the table. It will encrypt by utilizing the following javascript from being opened as an attachment from email (posing as some document file).   Once full encrypted you’ll get a popup text document informing you that all your files have been encrypted and how to pay money to get your key to decrypt. This specific sample is Russian, and the instructions were also in Russian so I didn’t show it here. The really interesting thing about this variant that I wanted to share […]

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Cryptographic Locker

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It seems as though every few weeks we see a new encrypting ransomware variant. It’s not surprising either since the business model of ransoming files for money is tried and true. Whether it’s important work documents, treasured wedding pictures, or complete discographies of your favorite artists, everyone has valuable data they don’t want taken. This is the last thing anyone wants to see.   This variant does bring some new features to the scene, but also fails at other lessons learnt by previous variants. Starting with the new features this variant will now just “delete” the files after encrypting them (it just […]

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ZeroLocker

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Recently in the news we saw FireEye and Fox-IT provide the ability to decrypt files encrypted by older crpytolocker variants. They used the command and control servers seized by the FBI during operation Tovar. Since they have access to those RSA keys they essentially have the password required for every single file encrypted by a Cryptolocker variant that used Evgeniy Bogachev’s botnet. That is a major portion of the traditional​ red GUI cryptolocker that became famous. Any previous victims from these variants that still have encrypted files left on their machine should be able to decrypt them with ease. All they have to do is […]

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8 Tips to Stay Safe Online

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Yesterday, the New York Times published an exclusive story on what many are stating to be the largest series of hacks ever, all revealed by Hold Security in their latest report.  With a report of over 1.2 billion unique username-password combinations and over 500 million e-mail addressed amassed by a Russian hacker group dubbed CyberVol (vol is Russian for thief).  While the reactions among the security industry are mixed, with some researchers raising a few questions of the masterwork behind the hack, the story does bring to the public’s attention the necessity of strong, personal, online security policies for all […]

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Critroni/Onion – Newest Addition to Encrypting Ransomware

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In my last blog post about a week ago, I talked about how Cryptolocker and the like are not dead and we will continue to see more of them in action. It’s a successful “business model” and I don’t see it going away anytime soon. Not even a few days after my post a new encrypting ransomware emerged. This one even targets Russians! Presenting Critroni (aka. Onion)   This newest edition of encrypting ransomware uses the same tactics of contemporary variants including: paying through anonymous tor, using Bitcoin as the currency, changing the background, dropping instructions in common directories on how to pay the scam. […]

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Cryptolocker is not dead

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Recently in the news the FBI filed a status report updating on the court-authorized measures to neutralize GameOver Zeus and Cryptolocker. While the report states that “all or nearly all” of the active computers infected with GameOver Zeus have been liberated from the criminals’ control, they also stated that Cryptolocker is “effectively non-functional and unable to encrypt newly infected computers.” Their reasoning for this is that Cryptolocker has been neutralized by the disruption and cannot communicate with the command and control servers to receive instructions or send RSA keys after encryption. Read more here While seizing the majority of the […]

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Evolution of Encrypting Ransomware

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Recently we’ve seen a big change in the encrypting ransomware family and we’re going to shed light on some of the newest variants and the stages of evolution that have led the high profile malware to where it is today. For those that aren’t aware of what encrypting ransomware is, its a cryptovirus that encrypts all your data from local hard drives, network shared drives, removable hard drives and USB. The encryption is done using an RSA -2048 asymmetric public key which makes decryption without the key impossible. Paying the ransom will net you the key which in turn leads to getting […]

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