Industry Intel

Unexpected Side Effects: How COVID-19 Affected our Click Habits

Phishing has been around for ages and continues to be one of the most common threats that businesses and home users face today. But it’s not like we haven’t all been hearing about the dangers of phishing for years. So why do people still click? That’s what we wanted...

Key Considerations When Selecting a Web Classification Vendor

Since launching our web classification service in 2006, we’ve seen tremendous interest in our threat and web classification services, along with an evolution of the types and sizes of cybersecurity vendors and service providers looking to integrate this type of...

4 Ways MSPs Can Fine-Tune Their Cybersecurity Go-To-Market Strategy

Today’s work-from-home environment has created an abundance of opportunities for offering new cybersecurity services in addition to your existing business. With cyberattacks increasing in frequency and sophistication, business owners and managers need protection now...

Ransomware: The Bread and Butter of Cybercriminals

Imagine a thief walks into your home and rummages through your personal belongings. But instead of stealing them, he locks all your valuables into a safe and forces you to pay a ransom for the key to unlock the safe. What choice do you have? Substitute your digital...

Cyber News Rundown: Ryuk Wreaks Healthcare Havoc

Ryuk Shuts Down Universal Health Services

Computer systems for all 400 Universal Health Services facilities around the globe have reportedly been shut down following an attack by the Ryuk ransomware group. Ryuk is known for targeting large organizations, but the healthcare industry has been gaining popularity among these groups due to high volumes of sensitive information and typically low levels of security. It’s unknown if the healthcare firm has paid ransoms for the encrypted data or if they are restoring systems from available backups.

Global Insurance Firm Targeted by Ransomware

The Fortune 500 insurance firm AJG was forced to take several computer systems offline over the weekend after identifying a cyber-attack. It’s still unclear which ransomware variant was responsible for the attack and officials with the firm haven’t revealed if customer or employee information was stolen. Third-party researchers confirmed multiple AJG servers, unpatched for a serious vulnerability, could have been the entry point for the attack.

French Shipping Company Knocked Offline by Ransomware

All computer systems and websites belonging to CMA CGM, a French shipping giant, were knocked offline by a crippling ransomware attack. This attack on CMA CGM makes them the fourth international shipping company to fall victim to a cyberattack, which have proven profitable, in as many years. The company has verified that the Ragnar Locker ransomware group was behind the attack, though they have not revealed the ransom asked.

Cyber Attack Forces Swatch to Disconnect Online Services

Though not confirmed by Swatch, the Swiss watchmaker was reportedly forced to take many of their systems offline after likely falling victim to a ransomware attack. While the company did not verify the type of attack, ransomware’s prevalence this year makes it a likely culprit. Swatch has announced they plan to seek legal action against the attackers.

DDoS Attacks See Substantial Rise in 2020

There were over 4.8 million DDoS attacks during the first half of 2020, a 15% rise over the same period last year. May alone saw more than 900,000 DDoS attacks, a record for most in a single month. Ninety percent of these attacks lasted for under an hour, marking another shift from previous years’ attacks. They have also increased in complexity, leaving victims and researchers with little time to defend themselves.

False Confidence is the Opposite of Cyber Resilience

Have you ever met a person who thinks they know it all? Or maybe you’ve occasionally been that person in your own life? No shame and no shade intended – it’s great (and important) to be confident about your skills. And in cases where you know your stuff, we encourage you to keep using your knowledge to help enhance the lives and experiences of the people around you.

But there’s a big difference between being reasonably confident and having false confidence, as we saw in our recent global survey. Featured in the report COVID-19 Clicks: How Phishing Capitalized on a Global Crisis, the survey data shows that, all over the world, people are pretty confident about their ability to keep themselves and their data safe online. Unfortunately, people are also still getting phished and social engineering tactics aimed at employees are still a major way that cybercriminals successfully breach businesses. These data points strongly suggest that we aren’t all being quite as cyber-safe as we think.

Overconfidence by the Numbers

Approximately 3 in 5 people (59%) worldwide think they know enough to stay safe online.

You may think 59% doesn’t sound high enough to earn the label of “false confidence”. But there were two outliers in our survey who dragged the average down significantly (France and Japan, with only 44% and 26% confidence, respectively). If you only take the average of the five other countries surveyed (the US, UK, Australia/New Zealand, Germany and Italy), it’s a full ten percentage points higher at 69%. UK respondents had the highest level of confidence out of all seven regions surveyed with 75%.

8 in 10 people say they take steps to determine if an email message is malicious.

Yet 3 in 4 open emails and click links from unknown senders.

When so many of us claim to know what to do to stay safe online (and even say we take steps to determine the potential sketchiness of our emails), why are we still getting phished? We asked Dr. Prashanth Rajivan, assistant professor at the University of Washington and expert in human behavior and technology, for his take on the matter. He had two important points to make.

Individualism

According to Dr. Rajivan, it’s important to note that Japan had the lowest level of confidence about their cybersecurity know-how (only 26%), but the survey showed they also had the lowest rate of falling victim to phishing (16%). He pointed out that countries with more individualistic cultures seem to align with countries who ranked themselves highly on their ability to keep themselves and their data safe.

“When people adopt a less individualistic mindset and, instead, perceive themselves to have a greater responsibility to others, their average level of willingness to take risks decreases. This is especially important to note for businesses that want to have a cyber-aware culture.”

– Prashanth Rajivan, Ph.D.

The Dunning-Kruger Effect

Another factor Dr. Rajivan says may contribute to overconfidence in one’s ability to spot phishing attacks might be a psychological phenomenon called the “Dunning-Kruger Effect”. The Dunning-Kruger Effect refers to a cognitive bias in which people who are less skilled at a given task tend to be overconfident in their ability, i.e. we tend to overestimate our capabilities in areas where we are actually less capable.

How These Numbers Affect Businesses

Only 14% of workers feel that a company’s cyber resilience is a responsibility all employees share.

The correlations between overconfidence and individualism may also translate into a mentality that workers are not responsible for their own cybersecurity during work hours. While 63% of workers surveyed agree that a cyber resilience strategy that includes both security tools and employee education should be a top priority for any business, only 14% felt that cyber resilience was a shared responsibility for all employees.

How to Create a Cyber Aware Culture

The short answer: a strong combination of employee training and tools.

The long answer: when asked what would help them feel better prepared to avoid phishing and prevent cyberattacks, workers worldwide agreed that their employers need to invest more heavily in training and education, in addition to strong cybersecurity tools. Dr. Rajivan also agrees, stating that, if employers want to build cybersecurity awareness into their business culture, then they need to invest heavily in their people.

“By creating a feeling of personal investment in the individuals who make up a company, you encourage the employees to return that feeling of investment toward their workplace. That’s a huge part of ensuring that cybersecurity is part of the culture. Additionally, if we want to enable employees to assess risk properly, we need to cut down on uncertainty and blurring of context lines. That means both educating employees and ensuring we take steps to minimize the ways in which work and personal life get intertwined.”

– Prashanth Rajivan, Ph.D.

Additionally, he tells us, “Human behavior is shaped by past experiences, consequences and reinforcement. To see a real change in human behavior related to phishing and online risk-taking habits in general, people need frequent and varied experiences PLUS appropriate feedback that incentivizes good behavior.”

Ultimately, the importance of training can’t be emphasized enough. According to real-world data from customers using Webroot® Security Awareness Training, which provides both training courses and easy-to-run, customizable phishing simulations, consistent training can reduce click rates on phishing scams by up to 86.5%.

It’s clear a little training can go a long way. If you want to increase cyber resilience, you have to minimize dangerous false confidence. And to do that, you need to empower your workforce with the tools and training they need to confidently (and correctly) make strong, secure decisions about what they do and don’t click online.

Learn more about Security Awareness Training programs.

Cyber News Rundown: LokiBot Attacks Increase

DHS Announces Massive Increase in LokiBot Attacks

By monitoring and tracking of cyberattacks over 2020, U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) officials have uncovered a significant increase in cyberattacks being carried out by LokiBot, a malicious info-stealer of stored passwords and cryptocurrency information. The increase in LokiBot attacks can likely be attributed to its ability to steal credentials from hundreds of applications, and its range of other features that make it appealing to a wide variety of cyber criminals.

Long Island Hospital Suffers Data Breach

Blackbaud, a third-party vendor for a Long Island hospital, may have exposed sensitive patient information after it suffered a data breach this summer. In a July statement, Blackbaud revealed personally identifiable information for a number of patients was stolen but claimed it was destroyed shortly afterwards. Affected patients have been contacted regarding the breach and stolen information.

Thousands of Customers Exposed in Town Sports Breach

A database containing highly sensitive information belonging to over 600,000 customers and employees of Town Sports International was found publicly exposed on the internet. Town Sports recently filed for bankruptcy and was notified of this breach roughly a week later. While the company did not publically respond to the findings, the information secured the following day included everything from physical addresses to payment card info and other billing data. Past clients of the fitness chain should be wary of any emails they receive regarding their Town Sports memberships.

Global Operation Takes Down Major Dark Web Drug Network

In a major collaboration between Europol and other global intelligence organizations, 179 individuals across six countries have been arrested in relation to drug trafficking through Dark Web markets. Officials also revealed that this bust allowed them to seize $6.5 million in cash and hundreds of kilograms of illicit drugs. The operation is another setback for anonymous marketplaces allowing for the buying and selling of illegal goods and services as law enforcement continues to target rogue online bazaars.

Data from Over 200 Merchants Leaked in Shopify Breach

Data from at least 200 merchants was compromised after an internal support employee for Shopify was found to be stealing data. While the data included only basic contact information on customers and no payment card or social security info was taken, officials for Shopify are still working to determine the extent of the theft and if it has further changed hands. The employees involved with this breach have since been fired and all access to Shopify systems has been revoked to prevent further incident.

Cyber News Rundown: Magecart Massive Attack

Magecart Launches Largest E-commerce Attack to Date

Roughly 2000 e-commerce sites were compromised in the latest Magecart campaign targeting an out-of-date version of Magento software. It’s believed an additional 95,000 sites that haven’t patched to the latest Magento version could also be targeted by the payment skimming malware. The campaign began last Friday and by Monday had stolen data from over 1,900 stores serving tens of thousands of customers.

Staples Delivery System Responsible for Data Breach

Nearly two weeks after being contacted by a cybersecurity firm regarding their use of unsecured VPN servers, Staples has released a statement about a data breach that stemmed from a flaw in their delivery systems. Because Staples’ delivery tracking system required only an order number to pull up the entire order summary, customers were able to enter any number around their own order and access payment and other sensitive information belonging to other Staples customers. While the company has since resolved the flaw, it seems they have not yet contacted victims whose information was exposed.

Staffing Firm Suffers Second Ransomware Attack in 2020

Artech Information Systems, a global IT staffing firm, has recently fallen victim to their second ransomware attack of the year. Following a January attack by the REvil ransomware group, which released a small portion of company data after not receiving a ransom payment, Artech has now been infiltrated by the MAZE group, likely using a prior backdoor to the systems. Secondary ransomware attacks typically stem from improper resolution of the initial attack that leaves a system an easy target for another group.

Misconfigured Elasticsearch Exposes Over 100,000 Razer Customers

A security researcher found an unsecured Elasticsearch cluster late last month containing highly sensitive information for over 100,000 Razer customers. The exposed data contained personally identifiable information and order details with everything but the actual payment card data. Fortunately, Razer was quick to resolve the issue after being notified and set up an email worried customers could contact for more information.

SunCrypt Ransomware Targets University Hospital New Jersey (UHNJ)

Over 240GB of data was allegedly stolen from the University Hospital New Jersey after a SunCrypt ransomware attack. The attack was likely initiated against university systems shortly after a TrickBot infection last month compromised systems. The owners of SunCrypt have already released 1.7GB of the stolen data, which equates to roughly 48,000 documents containing highly sensitive personal information on patients and employees.

Cyber News Rundown: Android Giveaway Fraud

Thousands of Android Users fall Victim to Giveaway Fraud

Upwards of 65,000 Android users were potentially compromised after installing a malicious app promising free giveaways. Over the year the scam was in effect, roughly 5,000 apps were spoofed to lure victims into downloading in exchange for a phony giveaway. In reality, the infection pushes silent background ads which generate ad revenue for the scammers and decrease device performance.

North American Real Estate Firm Hit by Ransomware

A new ransomware variant known as DarkSide claimed its first victim, Brookfield Residential,  after operating for nearly two weeks. The North American real estate developer recently noticed unauthorized access to several systems and was left a ransom note stating that over 200GB of data had been stolen. The data has since been published to DarkSide’s leak site, which has prompted many to speculate the ransom was not paid by Brookfield Residential.

Cryptominers Caught Using AI

Researchers have been at work creating an AI algorithm to detect malicious cryptocurrency miners while avoiding legitimate ones. The detection method compares currently running miners to graphs of both legitimate and illegitimate miners and monitors changes between the processes being used and the scheduling of mining activity. This type of detection may be put to use to decrease the overall use of malicious code that can often tax the system’s CPU usage to max capacity.

Los Angeles School District Suffers Cyber Attack

Just weeks after the FBI issued a warning about the threat of cyberattacks against school districts, the Rialto School District in California has fallen victim to just such an attack. These setbacks have made the return to online schooling particularly difficult. The extent of the attack remains unclear and officials are still working to determine the effects on the 25,000 enrolled students.

Maze Ransomware Cartel Adds New Variant Team

The authors of the lesser-known ransomware variant SunCrypt have recently joined forces with the Maze ransomware cartel. It’s believed the new cartel members were brought in to assist with the high volume of attacks that the Maze Group is handling and are being paid with a portion of its profits. In addition to new revenue streams from its partnership with the organization, cartel members also benefit from access to the Maze Group’s resources including obfuscation techniques and posting cartel member’s stolen data to their dedicated leak site.

Cyber News Rundown: Ransomware Targets Major Cruise Line

Ransomware Attack Targets Major Cruise Line

Officials for Carnival Cruises have confirmed that a portion of their IT systems were encrypted following a cyberattack identified over the weekend. The company also revealed that sensitive information for both employees and customers was illicitly accessed, though they did not admit to what extent.

Millions of Social Media Profiles Exposed

More than 235 million social media profiles belonging to several major platforms, which contained personally identifiable information including names, locations and contact data, were publicly exposed due to a misconfigured database. Social Data, an online data marketing broker, seems to be the owner of the data, though it is unclear how they obtained it since data scraping for profit is generally not tolerated by Facebook or other platforms. According to Social Data, the database was exposed for up to three hours after initially spotted. It remains unknown how long the data was accessible without authentication.

Wine and Spirits Conglomerate Suffers Ransomware Attack

Brown-Forman, the parent company of many major liquor brands, recently fell victim to a ransomware attack that appears to be the work of the REvil ransomware authors. While the company was able to detect and thwart the attack before encryption, upwards of 1TB of highly sensitive internal information on employees, clients, and financial statements was stolen. Though no formal ransom was delivered, the attackers are likely to auction the data imminently.

File-less Worms Creates Linux Crypto-mining Botnet

Linux systems are on the lookout for a new infection that has been silently creating a botnet to employ ­­target machines as crypto miners. Since the start of the year, over 500 SSH servers have been infected around the world by a worm creating additional backdoors to allow attackers to return to the systems later. Due to the file-less nature of this infection, a simple reboot of the system can temporarily remove the malicious processes, but because the login credentials have already been exported the system can be quickly re-infected.

Canadian COVID-19 Relief Sites Breached

Several Canadian government websites connected to healthcare relief funds were breached with the intent to steal COVID-19 relief fund payments. Though only a small portion of the 12 million total accounts, 9,000 GCKey accounts were directly affected after being breached via credential-stuffing. Credential-stuffing uses brute force attacks with employs previously leaked credentials in the hopes victims use the same login info for multiple sites. Since the websites affected don’t use multi-factor authentication, the odds of a successful credential-related attack were increased.

Cyber News Rundown: Ransomware Strikes Colorado Town

Colorado Town Suffers Ransomware Attack

The town of Lafayette, Colorado, fell victim to a ransomware attack last week without the capability to recover from the attack without paying a ransom of $45,000 in cryptocurrency. The attack disabled many city services for a number of days until officials determined they would not be able to recover without paying for systems to be decrypted. This attack was another example of how having data backed up, even if somewhat dated, is less expensive and more secure in the long run.

Illinois Healthcare Data Breach

The Illinois healthcare system suffered a multi-month data breach stemming from several compromised email accounts earlier this year. The breach does not affect all IHS clients, but those who were affected had much of their sensitive information, including social security numbers and personal health documents, leaked. The breach began in early February, but victims were not informed until the end of July, when they were offered credit and identity monitoring services to protect against illicit use of their data.

Cyberattack Strikes InfoSec Training Organization

One of the largest cybersecurity training organizations was recently targeted by a phishing attack against an internal email account. The compromised account was then used to install an illicit Office365 add-on to maintain control of the account and to forward over 500 emails to a third-party account, many of which contained sensitive information on customers. Affected customers have been contacted and warned to be vigilant against future phishing attacks.

Pace Center Data Compromised Following Blackbaud Breach

Some donor data for the Florida-based non-profit Pace Center for Girls was leaked after a data breach targeted its software provider, Blackbaud, in May. The breach affected over 200 organizations relying on Blackbaud for cloud-computing services and contained personally identifiable information on thousands of donors. Fortunately, no payment card data was included in the breach and the Pace organization has begun improving security protocols to avoid further attacks. ­­

Payment Card Data Stolen from MSU Website

At least 2,600 individuals were possibly affected by a payment card leak after the Michigan State University online shop was infiltrated through a known website vulnerability. The attack used a card-skimming technique and remained active on the site for nearly a year, leaving many customer’s data vulnerable to other possible attacks. This would be the second cybersecurity-related incident to target MSU in the last year. In May, the university was hit with a ransomware attack that resulted in the publishing of stolen data.

Cyber News Rundown: Twitter Hack Arrests

Multiple Individuals Charged for Twitter Hack

Three people were charged with last month’s Twitter hack, which generated over $100,000 in bitcoin by hijacking high-profile accounts. Of the 130 accounts used to spread the Bitcoin scam, major names included Elon Musk and Bill Gates, who have been portrayed in similar past scams. The FBI was apparently able to identify the perpetrators through a known hacking forum offering Twitter account hacking services for a fee.

Kentucky Unemployment Faces Second Breach in 2020

Kentucky’s unemployment system suffered its second data breach of the year last week. The breach came to light after a user reported being able to view another’s sensitive information while attempting to review their own. Officials are still uncertain how the breach occurred or the exact contents of the information available to the person who reported the incident.

Canon Suffers Ransomware Attack

Several services related to Canon, including its cloud storage systems, fell victim to a ransomware attack that knocked them offline for nearly a week. In addition to the offline systems, more than 10TB of customer data were allegedly stolen and a ransom note pertaining to the Maze Ransomware variant was identified. A large number of Canon’s website domains were also taken offline, with an internal server error being displayed to site visitors.

Havenly Interior Design Breach

A data trove containing roughly 1.4 million Havenly user accounts were posted for sale on a Dark Web marketplace last week. It included personally identifiable information of customers including names, physical addresses and emails. The company’s official statement stated no financial information was lost in the breach. While Havenly has recommended all customers update their login credentials, the breach occurred well over a month ago, enough time for affected customers to be subjected to identity theft or attacks aimed at compromising further accounts.

Massive VPN Server Password Leak

The credentials for over 900 enterprise-level VPN servers from Pulse Secure recently appeared on a hacker forum known to be frequented by ransomware groups. The plain-text information contains enough information to take full control of the servers that are currently running a firmware with known critical vulnerabilities identified within the past two months. The vulnerability that allowed this breach, CVE-2019-11510, was identified and a patch was released late last year. Many of the attack’s victims had neglected to implement the patch.

Cyber News Rundown: WasteLocker Ransomware

Garmin Hit with WastedLocker Ransomware

Nearly a week after the company announced they had suffered a system outage, Garmin has finally admitted to falling victim to a ransomware attack, likely from the increasingly popular WastedLocker variant. As is the norm for WastedLocker, the attack was very specific in its targeting of the company (even mentioning Garmin by name in the ransom note) and took many of their services offline. Though Garmin has confirmed that no customer data was affected, they are still unsure when their services will return to full functionality.

Israeli Marketing Firm Suffers Data Breach

More than 14 million user accounts held by the Israeli marketing firm Promo were compromised in a recent breach. Subsequently, at least 1.4 million decrypted user passwords were found for sale on a Dark Web forum, along with 22 million records containing highly sensitive information. The company has since contacted affected customers and is pushing a forced password reset.

Netwalker Ransomware Targets U.S. Government Organizations

The FBI has released a security statement concerning Netwalker ransomware attacks, which have targeted both U.S. and foreign government agencies in recent months. Netwalker is known for exploiting remote desktop utilities to compromise major enterprise networks. It also offers ransomware-as-a-service to other cybercriminals. The best methods for blocking these types of attacks is setting up two-factor authentication (2FA) and creating offline data backups to protect in case of a successful breach.

Lazarus Hacking Group Branches Out to Ransomware

The North Korean state-sponsored hacking group Lazarus has added ransomware to their latest attacks. Unfortunately for the group, the ransomware variant they’ve chosen is inefficient at encrypting data, sometimes taking up to 10 hours to fully encrypt a single system. These attacks are similar to those targeting Sony Pictures in 2014 and those that affected the 2018 Winter Olympic games, both of which are suspected to have been conducted by state-backed actors.

Nefilim Ransomware Begins Publishing Dussman Groups Data

At least 14GB of data belonging to a subsidiary of Dussmann Group, a major German MSP, is being leaked by the operators of the Nefilim ransomware variant. The operators have confirmed they were able to obtain roughly 200GB of data from the subsidiary after discovering a still-unknown method for compromising the network. Customers affected by the leak have already been notified.

Cyber News Rundown: ATM Jackpotting Attacks Rise

ATM Jackpotting Attacks on the Rise

ATM manufacturer Diebold Nixdorf has identified a malicious campaign that uses proprietary software to “jackpot” the machines. The attack requires malicious actors to breach the ATM manually and then use the software to force the machine to dispense cash at a rapid rate, known within the industry as jackpotting. While these attacks don’t seem to affect customer data or finances, the company is unsure how the attackers obtained the proprietary software used in the scam.

Ransomware Locks Down Telecom Argentina

Telecom Argentina is being extorted for over $7.5 million following a ransomware attack last week. The hacker group REvil is believed to be behind the attack, which may mean the stolen data is set to be posted on the group’s auction site. Officials are still unsure of how the intrusion occurred, but it’s likely to have stemmed from a compromised remote access point.

Maryland Health Services Breach Affects Thousands

More than 40,000 individuals may have had personal information leaked after a ransomware attack on Lorien Health Services in Maryland. The breach was discovered in June, but after the healthcare provider refused to pay the ransom the hackers began publishing the stolen data, which includes Social Security Numbers and other highly sensitive information. Lorien was quick to notify affected clients and had begun offering credit monitoring services to those affected within two days of the attack being confirmed.

University of York Data Breach

The University of York in the UK has learned of a data breach that occurred in May and could affect a considerable number of students and staff. The breach itself was enabled by a third-party service provider and contained personally identifiable information on an unknown number of victims. While there is little the university can do to contain this type of attack, it comes as another reminder of the importance of supply chain data security and the knock-on effect of such attacks.

Meow Attacks Target Vulnerable Databases

Dozens of unsecured databases from Elasticsearch and MongoDB were wiped in a new malicious campaign that seems to attack indiscriminately. Discovered within the last week, the Meow attacks as they’re known appear to use an automated script to overwrite any data in vulnerable databases and destroy any remaining data. This string of attacks may encourage stronger security policies among previously lax database administrators, but the lesson is costly for affected businesses.

Cyber News Rundown: GoldenSpy

Malware Discovered in Chinese Tax Software

As part of an official Chinese tax initiative, researchers have found multiple backdoors into mandatory tax software installed on all Chinese business systems. The new malware is called GoldenHelper, in a nod to the command-and-control domain tax-helper.ltd, and has been in active development and use since 2018. The latest campaign, dubbed GoldenSpy, is adept at avoiding detection and began within months of the old command-and-control servers going offline.

Texas Collections Company Suffers Data Breach

The Texas billing and collection company Benefits Recovery Specialists Inc. has announced that a breach containing data on over 250,000 customers occurred in April. The breach leaked personally identifiable information including Social Security Numbers, birthdates and physical addresses, that could all be used to launch additional attacks. Affected clients began receiving notifications about the breach in June, though the company has still not shared what malware was installed by the perpetrators.

Microsoft Fixes 17-Year-Old DNS Flaw

After nearly 17 years of being active and exploitable, Microsoft has finally identified and resolved a major vulnerability involving a worm-like transmission that requires no human interaction. With the help of a third-party security firm Microsoft was able to patch the vulnerability before it caused significant damage, though the time was certainly there for malicious actors to use the flaw to execute any number of malicious executables onto an endless string of compromised machines.

UK Ticket Provider Leaves 4.8 Million Logins Unsecured

A collection of roughly 4.8 million login credentials have been found in a leaked database belonging to a major UK ticker provider serving customers around the world. Among the credentials were domains belonging to several government agencies along with millions of consumer webmail users. The site has also been targeted in the past by attackers looking to deface the website and has been called vulnerable to SQL injection should attackers pursue that method.

Wattpad Database Compromises Millions of Users

Officials have been working over the past week to remediate a data breach that could affect over 200 million users of Wattpad. The compromised database was listed for $100,000 on a Dark Web sale site, but was later re-listed with no price. Its owners claim to hold records for over 271 million users. Wattpad has stated that, though personally identifiable information was revealed in the breach, no financial information was accessible since Wattpad doesn’t store it directly on its servers.

Cyber News Rundown: Ragnar Locker

Ragnar Locker Attacks Portuguese Energy Producer

It was recently confirmed that Energias de Portugal (EDP), one of the largest energy producers in the world, has fallen victim to the Ragnar Locker ransomware variant. The original attack took place in April but was only discovered in May after nearly three weeks of being active on their systems. After contacting affected customers, the company also revealed it was subject to a Bitcoin ransom of roughly $10 million to ensure the stolen data wasn’t publicly released.

Xchanging MSP Falls Victim to Ransomware

An MSP known as Xchanging, which primarily serves the insurance industry, was hit with a ransomware attack over the weekend that forced it to take many of its systems offline. Though the attack was largely confined to Xchanging’s systems and only affected a small number of customers, it is still unclear how long the infection was active before discovery. In a statement, the company says it’s working to restore access to customer operating environments as quickly as possible.

Fitness Firm Exposes Customer Info

Nearly 1.3 million customer files and photos were compromised after the fitness firm V Shred was breached, potentially affecting up to 100,000 clients. The data was stored on an improperly configured Amazon S3 bucket that was discovered as a part of a larger mapping project that had already located several similar leaks. While V Shred confirmed much of the data was publicly available, it originally denied that the dataset itself contained full names, addresses, and other highly sensitive personal information that could be used maliciously.

Magecart Group Surpasses 570 Victim Sites

In the three years since Magecart Group 8’s initial foray onto the card-skimming scene, it has successfully compromised over 570 e-commerce sites around the world. More than 25 percent of the attacks targeted US domains and stemmed from 64 unique attack domains that were able to distribute injected JavaScript software with relative ease. Many were nearly identical to legitimate domains. It’s believed the group has netted over $7 million from selling stolen payment card information since April 2017.

Clubillion Casino App Leak Could Affect Millions

A database containing personally identifiable information on millions of users of the casino app Clubillion was compromised in late March. The breach was discovered and secured within five days, though heavy traffic to the site may have enabled the compromise of hundreds of thousands more individuals in that time. These types of apps are common targets of cyberattacks because they hold such large quantities of sensitive data that can be used for further attacks by leveraging the stolen data.